The Streets of Bridgwater and their Names

This page is a work in progress drafted through Spring and Summer 2021. There are lots of gaps in terms of dates and meanings, if you can help, have spotted and error or an omission, please get in contact and let us know.

Town Centre street names are largely medieval in origin, developing over centuries, usually from blunt descriptions and after people who lived there. Names were not officially given, but developed over time through common usage. Only in the nineteenth century did the Borough Council start to organise and formalise existing names. The naming of new streets from the Victorian expansion into the twentieth century would had have been the responsibility of the Borough Surveyor and the Town Councillors. Following the implementation of Local Government Act 1972 in March 1974, Bridgwater Borough Council was abolished, and Charter Trustees were created, drawn from the sixteen councillors elected to Sedgemoor District Council in Somerset, represented the borough wards, who maintained the continuity of the town’s legal status until such time as a parish or town council was established. Duties were limited to ceremonial activities. In Bridgwater’s case this extended to being responsible for the Town’s charters,  muniments and historic silver. This evidently included being involved in the choice of street names.

The formation of the Bridgwater Town Council in 2003 meant the responsibilities for the charters, muniments and silver and later the town museum  passed to it, but evidently did not extend to consultation on names. Currently names are granted at the whim of the District Council, or seem to be primarily developer-led, some of which are of doubtful quality and rarely of local relevance (Northgate ‘Yard’, for example, having been selected as being trendy, rather than having any relevance to the site; there has also been a modern fashion of using anodyne street names of birds, cows and trees, for example). Often these rootless names occupy the sites of more interesting fieldnames, and where appropriate these have been indicated.

As a general rule of thumb, new developments would be best to take the name of the fields, areas or site they were built over (so long as they have names, rather than blunt descriptions, such as ‘five acres’), data which can easily be found using the Tithe Map information in the map section of the Somerset HER.

At the bottom of this list are a number of notable omissions and suggestions for future names, relevant to the history of Bridgwater. It should be noted, for example, that very few streets are named in honour of women.

* This mark indicates one of the streets of the original medieval town and major routeways out of it.

+ This mark indicates a place outwith Bridgwater, to be added to a separate page down the line.

Can you help fill in some of the missing information here? If so please get in contact.

See bottom of page for Reference Abbreviations

A


Adscombe Avenue: Part of the Sydenham Estate, under construction in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177), the name referring to a hamlet near Over Stowey. Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. The name means the narrow valley belonging to Eadda or Aeddi (an Old English personal name –Ekwall). Built over a field called ‘Copland’, as recorded on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Acacia Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

*Albert Street: The layout dates to sometime in the thirteenth century, not long after West Street was laid out when and divided into burgage property plots. The name Albert Street dates to the 1850s (exact date needed), in honour of Prince Albert. Before this it was called Roper’s Lane (by 1735 Stratchey’s Mapsignificance needs expanded). Before that, from at least 1380, it was called Blind Lane, because it terminated in a dead end (BBA, no.355) presumably before Halswell Lane joined it up to West Street.

Alberta Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Presumably named after the part of Canada.

Albion Close: (Modern Brownfield development date TBC – built on the site of the old collar factory) Possibly named in reference to the town’s football team? Albion is a Latin name for Great Britain, rooted in the word for ‘white’, referring to the white cliffs of Dover.

Alderney Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans) One of the Channel Islands. Unknown significance to Bridgwater.

Alexandra Road: First phase built 1865. Block of first called Alexandra Place (Squibbs no.138). Named after Princess Alexandra of Denmark (1844-1925) who was married to the future Edward VII in 1863. West side complete by 1888, east side by 1904 OS map.

Alfoxton Road: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. Refers to the village of Alfoxton, which means ‘Aelfheah’s farmstead’. Ekwall.

All Saints Terrace: Built when the Westonzoyland Road level crossing was converted to a railway bridge here in c.1873 (MS), to continue to provide access to Colley Lane. This side lane probably had no name until it was referred to in reference to All Saint’s Mission Chapel, part of St John’s Church, built in in 1882 (Pidoux). That chapel may have taken its lead from the medieval chapel of the same name in St Mary’s Church.

Allen Road: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. Possibly refers to Douglas Allen, local photographer (with thanks to Geoff Harding)

Alma Terrace, Mount Street: named after the Battle of Alma during the Crimean War, 20 September 1854. Built after 1888 as does not appear on the OS Town Plan.

Almond Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Amber Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Hither Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Yonder Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Andersfield Close: Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. The name means ‘Andrew’s Field’. This road is built over a field called ‘Bradland’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

*Angel Crescent: Regency terrace built in 1816, named after the Angel Inn which stood on the High Street and backed onto Clare Street near the top of the terrace. The Angel Inn was a medieval institution, and is first mentioned in the sixteenth century and was demolished in 1824 in favour of the Royal Clarence Hotel, a religious name probably because it was part of the church’s property (VCH; Squibbs, no.4). The road now referred to as Angel Crescent will date to the town’s foundation in 1200, being the route from the Northgate to the High Street. It was called ‘twixt Northgate and Orlove Street’ (Orlove now Clare Street) in 1352 (BBA, no.165) also called ‘twixt North Gate and Castle Drawbridge’ in 1372 (BBA, no. 276), suggesting the route incorporated part of what is now Clare Street and round to York Buildings.

Angel Place: Shopping centre named after Angel Crescent. Opened by the Queen in 1987 (BM)

Angelica Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Angelica is an aromatic plant. Candied (cooked up in sugar and cooled) it can be cut into slivers and used as a cake decoration. 

Angoni Place: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name of Unclear significance.

Angus Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Angus is a region of Scotland, although possibly refers to the type of cow here. Built over a field called Priest Meadow (TAM).

Anson Way: (1980s Docks development – date TBC) Named after famous admirals of the Royal Navy, keeping with the notion of ‘Admirals Landing’. Like Drake who also got a road in this development, George Anson 1697-1792, circumnavigated the globe, won numerous battles and reformed the navy.

Anstice Place: Court on the north side of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Presumably named after the owner and/or builder – possibly Robert Anstice or a member of his family. Still standing on the 1930s OS map. Seems to have been demolished by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Apple Tree Close: Shown on the 1974 Town Guide plan. One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Appleyard Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Ironically, despite dozens of Bridgwater developments being built over former orchards, this walk was not.

Apricot Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Arlington Close: (20th c. Hamp development – date TBC) unknown significance

Ash Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Ashford Close: (20th c. Hamp development – date TBC) Unknown significance, possibly after the hamlet of Ashford with the Bridgwater pumping station, although part of a development that tended to honour notable Bridgwater people.

Ashgrove Way: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after tree groves.

Ashleigh Avenue: Not on the 1904 OS Map, but appears in the next edition (revised sometime between 1910 and 1940) (exact date needed) Built over former orchards (Tithe Apportionment Map). The dog-leg entrance from the Taunton Road is because it was built over the gardens of a small court of cottages called Craze’s Buildings, which also gave access to a larger house – possibly Ashleigh House? Otherwise the name is of unknown significance.

Ashleigh Terrace: Side street off Ashleigh Avenue, built at the same time.

Ashman Way: Not clear – possibly part of the Wilstock development?

Ashton Road: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Aspen Court: Access road built over the garden of Aspen Grove House, Wembdon Road. Appears on the 1888 OS Map, and in 1864 photographs of the Wembdon Road Cemetery (Blake Museum Collections). House presumably of the 1840s or 1850s, although this is still farmland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map. Aspen is a type of tree.

Aster Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Athlone Road: Part of the 1930s Hamp development. Several nearby streets were named after royal titles, and this appears to refer to Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone. Road appears in the 1939 Town Guide.

Augusta Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Avalon Road: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. This is a reference to the mythical Isle of Avalon from the King Arthur legends, assumed to be Glastonbury. Much more uplifting than the fieldnames it was built over; ‘Tynes’ and ‘Kiss Arse Causeway‘. This road partially follows the line of Moot’s Lane – only part of which survives (see that entry). ‘Kiss Arse Causeway’ is of unknown significance. (Tithe Apportionment Map)

Avebury Drive: (modern development – date TBC) – unknown significance. Presumably relating to the village of the same name in Wiltshire.

The Avenue: Shopping arcade, built into an older house by the time of the 1904 OS map. Originally called ‘Blake Parade’. Altered in 1927 (Somerset Heritage Centre A/CMY/174) for H. Squibbs,

Axe Road: Colley Lane Industrial Estate. This was one of the first new roads, laid out c.1965 (Town Guide, 1965, p.61). One of a number of roads in this estate to be named after Somerset Rivers, Axe being an old Brythonic word for ‘flowing water’ (Ekwall). Follows the line of the much older ‘Black Lane‘. This lane appears on the 1888 OS Map, but is not on the 1840s Tithe map – either it was just a small track in the former, or it may have been laid out to provide access to the GWR railway sidings. Presumably the lane was quite dark, hence ‘black’.

Azalea Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

B

Back Lane: see Clare Street

Back Quay: See Binford Place

Bagborough Drive: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Unknown significance, many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders.

Bailey Street: Built by the time of the 1904 OS Map. Originally Bailey Street was just the northern part of this road up to the bend, south of which was known as Upper Rosebury Avenue. Name of unknown significance. Built around a shirt collar factory, now the site of Albion Street. A local story has it that Bailey Street is believed to be when they built sections for Bailey Bridges in Bridgwater during World War Two, although the existence of the street on earlier OS maps would count against this (MS).

Ball’s Lane: See King Street

Balmoral Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after the Royal Palace in Scotland.

Barberry Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Barclay Street: Named after Robert Barclay (1648-1690), a Scot and leading thinker of the Quaker movement. Named on account of the land being owned by a notable Quaker charity of Bristol. Laid out circa 1833 (see Somerset Heritage Centre DD/SC/G1393/350). Partially demolished for the Broadway by 1967 (C/GP/HF/222).

Barrows Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Unknown significance, many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders.

*Bath Road: with Monmouth Street, this is a very old causeway over the marshes to the Polden Hills, and called as such, probably at the time Bristol Road was built, because Bath would be the major destination for the route. Dates to at least the year 1200 and the establishment of Bridgwater as a town, possibly older. A large loop in the River Parrett went almost as far as Crandon Bridge, hence this route pre-dates the Bristol Road by some centuries.

Bathroad Place: See Cannon Close.

Bath Terrace: A row of cottages running off of the north side of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Name of unclear significance, either named after the owner/builder, the town of Bath, or a bathhouse. Still standing on the 1930s OS map and 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Bayford Road: Not on 1939 Town Guide plan. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177).Name of unknown significance.

Bayswater Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand: named after a fancy part of London. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

+Beam Wireless Station: Refers to the Chop Beam Wireless Station, an early twentieth century Marconi site at Huntworth. The structures housing the generators, transmission room etc were converted to housing and are still there. The Imperial wireless chain was a strategic international wireless telegraph communication network, linking the countries of the British Empire. Between 1929 and 1940 the Huntworth Beam wireless station received high-frequency communications from Drummondville in Quebec, in Canada, and Kliphevel, (now Klipheuwel), Cape town in South Africa. It worked with the transmitter station in Bodmin. The beam antenna for the wireless station was  almost half a mile long and consisted of a series of five 277ft lattice masts, erected in a line at 640ft apart and at right angles to the overseas receiving station. These were topped by a traverse from which hung  a curtain antenna. Although the site has long been closed and all equipment was removed, the object is remembered in the naming of 5 properties in the village which housed it as Beam Wireless cottages.

Beckworth Close: (Late 20th c Westonzoyland Road development – date TBC) Unknown significance.

Bedford Close: (Late 20th c Westonzoyland Road development – date TBC) Unknown significance.

Beech Drive: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Beech Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Beechwood: Built over part of the grounds of Sunnybank House. Name of unknown significance, although likely to refer to trees. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey.

Begonia Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Belgravia Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after a fancy part of London.

Bell Close: (late 1990s Sully’s/ Crowpill Coal Yard redevelopment – date TBC). Named after George Bell, headmaster of Eastover School (with thanks to Molly Warren)

Bell Lane: See Moat Lane

Bellis Avenue: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Belmont Close Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. Unknown significance. Belmont just means pretty hill,

Belmont Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance, presumably just a nice sounding word.

Berry Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Unknown significance, many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders. Possibly Robert Seymore Berry, vicar of St Mary’s, who drowned in 1930 and is buried in the Wembdon Road Cemetery.

Berrydale Avenue: Part of the 1930s Kendale ‘Newtown’ development. Significance unknown. Roman coin found here in 1958. Built by the 1937 Whitby Directory.

Biddiscombe Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Unknown significance, many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders.

Bilberry Lane: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Bincombe Road: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Unknown significance – a village in Dorset?

*Binford Place: Named after Binford House, which stood where the Carnegie Library does today. That house was named after William Binford, who purchased it in 1742. Prior to this the street was known as Back Quay (by 1735 and the Stratchey Map at least), as this was a quayside for the loading of barges to take goods up river. Also known as the Langport Quay, as this was the primary destination for the barges (Lawrence). The surviving slipway is known as the Langport Slip. In medieval documents Binford Place was referred to as Frog Lane (by 1260), and this once extended into Blake Gardens as far as the Durleigh Brook, to ‘Lyme Bridge’. Frog Lane was a typical medieval name for somewhere quite wet, for obvious reasons.

Bircham Close: Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate: appears on the 1961 Town Guide Plan. Name of unclear significance: St Mary’s Church had a vicar William Henry Haves Bircham, 1897-1901. Possibly named as such as the access road to this estate was built over the site of the vicarage of St Mary’s, ‘the Grange’? However, Bircham was not an especially significant vicar of the such, unlike his successor Rev. Powell for example.

Blackdown Road: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Refers to the Blackdown Hills, literally the ‘Black Hill Hills’, near Taunton.

Blacklands: Built after 1888 and before 1904 (precise date needed). Called Blacklands Road on the 1904 Ordinance Survey Map, now just referred to as Blacklands. This street takes its name from the larger set of fields on which it was built, first mentioned in 1325. Literally meaning black soil, possibly the site of an ancient settlement.

Black Lane: See Axe Road

Blake Parade: See The Avenue

Blake Place: Part of the 1840s St John’s Church development, and named by William Baker, who is buried directly opposite in the corner of the churchyard of St John’s. The land had been purchased by the town with money left to it by General-at-Sea Robert Blake in 1657 as a charity endowment held in trust for the support of the poor. The land, known then as Jacob’s Land was renamed Blake’s Land. This is recorded on a painted panel in St Mary’s Church, a transcription can be found on p. 317 of W. Hepworth Dixon’s Robert Blake Admiral and General at Sea (1852). Who ‘Jacob’ was is unknown.

*Blake Street: A cul de sac leading from Dampiet Street, and probably once part of it, as Dampiet is a corruption of ‘Dam-yete’, meaning ‘the way to the dam’. The dam would be part of the mill infrastructure at the bottom of Blake Street (Dilks). Also called Mill-Tail, as remembered in the nineteenth century (Metford), ‘tail’ being a reference to a dead-end street. Previously known known as Mill Lane (1735 Stratchey Map), as it led to the town Mill at the Durleigh Brook. By 1861 it had been renamed Blake Street, probably through the influence of George Parker, Bridgwater historian and sometime mayor, who lived in Blake House. That house had belonged to the father (and later brother) of General at Sea Robert Blake (to whom the name is dedicated), assumed to be where Blake was born, and certainly where he grew up, which was bought by the Borough Council in 1926 for the town museum.

Blakes Lane: Wembdon. A very old trackway, named after Blake’s Farm, which takes its named from ownership by a member of the Blake family. Originally a dead end off Hollow Lane, with only a footpath to St George’s Church.

Blakes Road: Wembdon. A mid-to-late 20th century extension to Blake’s Lane (date TBC), to connect it with Church Road, which roughly followed the line of an old footpath. Does not appear on the 1946 RAF photographs. The portion perpendicular to Church Road is older and once part of that road, although appears to be a cottage garden on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map – converted to a road by the 1888 OS map, houses built there by 1946.

Blenheim Road: (modern development, date TBC) One of a series of roads in a new estate to be named after historic palaces. Built over a field called ‘Southovers’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Blind Lane: See Albert Street

Bloom Row: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora.

Bloomsbury Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after a fancy part of London.

Blossom Close: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Presumably originally planted with blossoming trees.

Bluebell Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Boards Road: Late 20th century road as part of the Wyld’s Road Industrial area. Built over the line of the former Somerset and Dorset Railway line, built in turn over Castlefields. Presumably named after John Board, nineteenth century industrialist who built the Concrete Castle.

Bond Street: possibly laid out 1720s as part of the Chandos development, although possibly older from the time of the castle. This refers to the town’s Bonded Warehouse, built by Chandos.

Bonita Drive: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett. Named after a much loved steam tug that took ships up and down the river. In use from 1866, she could tow up to six vessels. She was sunk off Liverpool in May 1941 by German
aircraft (Reference Index). This is a Spanish word for pretty.

Booth Way: built 1980s on part of the Wembdon Levels, on a field previously used by Cyril Moate for his horses. It was originally intended to link into the proposed Northern Distributor Road, although when that was eventually built twenty years later, the two were not joined up. Presumably named after Booth of Salvation Army fame?

Bosmara Drive: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name of Unclear significance.

Bouverie Road: The Bouverie family owned Brymore, and a Bouverie was chair of the Bridgwater Poor Law Union from 1838, so in charge of the Northgate Workhouse. More info TF. Brymore Close is a street quite close by. Built over a field called ‘Gundlehays’ (TAP). Appears on the 1930 OS map, so presumably built soon after the Quantock Road.

Bowline Close: NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unclear significance.

Bower Avenue: Part of the Sydenham estate: shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Not on 1939 Town Guide plan. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Refers to nearby East Bower (see below).

Bower Lane: Ancient trackway leading off of the Bath Road (so presumably contemporary or later) heading south towards Dunwear. Refers to East Bower (as opposed to West Bower, near Durleigh). The name derives from the Old English ‘bur’ meaning cottage (Ekwall).

Bowerings Road: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Exactly which Bowering this refers to needs TBC, many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders.

Bowling Green: See East Quay

Bradfield Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders. This probably refers to Mayor David Bradfield, stonemason, who died in office in 1914.

Bramble Road: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant very common in this area – the blackberry bush.

Branksome Avenue: Built sometime after 1904 off Bath Road. Abutted the Bailey Street collar factory. Name of unknown significance.

Bransby Way: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Name of unclear significance. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett?

Brantwood Road: Wembdon. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974). Possibly riffing on adjoining name ‘Inwood’ (named after a demolished house), presumably named after the home of John Ruskin in Cumbria. Other names in this development had Cumbrian or north western origins, such as Risedale and Grasmere (both Cumbria), Silverdale (Lancashire). Unclear relationship to Wembdon.

Brendon Road: Part of the earlier phase of the Newtown Estate of the 1930s, built by the 1937 Whitby Directory. Named after the Brendon Hills of Exmore, the ‘Brown Hill Hills’ (Ekwall).

Brendon Way: (part of the later extension to the Newtown Estate – date TBC) A later phase of the Newtown Estate, taking its name over Brendon Road. Built over the site of a Ropewalk, which was still standing in 1946, and a field called Dunmead – possibly meaning the ‘hill meadow’.

Brent Terrace: [is this in Bridgwater?] Refers to the nearby village of the same name. Brent is a south-western placename, from the Old Welsh for ‘high place’ (Ekwall).

Breton Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. A Breton is somewhere from Brittany (Little Britain), a Brythonic enclave of France. Although here is possibly a reference to the Bretonne Pie Noir tupe of cow.

Brigg Close: NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unknown significance. Built over a field called ‘Escott’s Marshes’.

Brimley Grove: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Bristol Road: the way to Bristol. Built 1828-1830 by John Bowen, engineer for the Bridgwater Turnpike Trust (VCH), previously this route having been blocked by a large loop it the River Parrett, which was diverted 1677-8. On the 1886 OS Map, the two terraces were yet to be built: Carlyle Terrace (1-53 Bristol Road) was built on the west and Stanley Terrace on the east (with thanks to Davc Ferris)

Britannia Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand, although there is a slim chance it was named after a ship built on the Parrett in 1831. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Broadlands Lane: Although now skirting a modern estate, this is an old trackway off of Spaxton Road, which gave access to several fields, including one called ‘Bradland’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, the meaning being the broad/open lands. An adjoinging field is called Crosslands, presumably a reference to the adjoining junction of Spaxton Lane and West Bower Road.

Broadoak Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types. Built over a field called ‘Deacon’s’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Broadway: The Town Centre Bypass, literally the broad way. Construction begun at the junction of St John Street and Eastover in April 1957, opened as far as Taunton Road on 29 March 1958, with the new Blake Bridge. The second stage, as far as the West Street and Penel Olieu, was in progress in 1963 and opened in February 1964. (Blake 2; Squibbs).

Brooklands: Part of the later southern phase of the Sydenham estate. Name of no obvious significance to the area – there does not appear to have been a nearby brook, only rhynes. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built over a field called ‘Moots’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, not far from a cottage of the same name on the 1888 OS map. Moots is probably possessive, the land belong to Mr Moot.

Browne’s Drive: See Elmwood Avenue.

Brue Avenue: Colley Lane Industrial Estate. Laid out circa 1968, complete by 1974 (Town Guides, 1968, 1974) One of a number of roads in this estate to be named after Somerset Rivers. Brue derives from an Old Welsh term for ‘brisk’ (Ekwall).

Bryant’s Buildings: See Sibley’s Buildings.

Bryer Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders. Bryer TBC

Brymore Close: Modern cul-de-sac, possibly 1980s? Accessed over part of the old garden of Halesleigh Tower. Refers to a hamlet outside of Cannington. The name means ‘broom covered moor’ (Ekwall)

Buckingham Close: Modern cul-de-sac, possibly 1980s? Presumably refers to the Palace in London.

Bugle Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Bullrush Path: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Bune Villas: NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unclear significance, Bune appears to be the name of a demon recorded in seventeenth century texts.

Butleigh Close: Part of the later southern phase of the Sydenham estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. The village of Butleigh is not far from Glastonbury. The name means ‘Budecca’s grove or meadow’

C

Cambridge Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Possibly a reference to the creation of Prince William and Kate to Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in 2011. Otherwise it may just a pleasing name to sound grand. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Camden Road: Unknown significance, possibly named after a person (such as the historian) or after the place in London – possibly part of the late nineteenth century trend for British towns and cities to name streets after London landmarks (such as Charing Cross). The south-most part was called ‘Timberlake’s Garden’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map, and was a nursery on the 1888 OS map. Among the Gibson architectural drawings we find mention of 8 houses designed in February 1897; more houses from August 1898; 16 more houses from April 1899; 13 houses from June 1899 (Gibson A\CMY/18, 95, 110 189). The 1904 OS map shows Camden and Blacklands almost complete, save for 7 or 8 houses in the north western corner.

Campion Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

The Cannon: See Cross Rifles

Cannon Close: Modern development, built by 2006. Takes its name from the cannon on the roundabout (see Cross Rifles). The site of a coal yard and a row of cottages called ‘Bathroad Place‘ on the 1888 OS Town Plan. These were still standing at the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Canworth Way: (Late 20th c Westonzoyland Road development – date TBC) Unknown significance.

Capes Close: named after the Rev John Moore Capes, who built St John’s Church, Eastover, in 1846, and was the first Vicar. See Squibbs 43 (Check St John’s book, Capes Dates and Street layout)

Caradon Place: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names.

Carlton Drive: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names. The northern part is built over a field called Escott’s Marshes (TAM)

Carlyle Terrace: Bristol Road. Built sometime after the 1886 OS map. Most likely named after the writer Thomas Carlyle 1795-1881.

Carolina Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Carpathian Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the central European mountain range. Built over a field called ‘Hawk’s Nest’ (TAM).

Carver Close: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett. Named after the Carver family of shipwrights who had a yard on East Quay, and built ships like the Irene.

Cassia Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Castle Ditch: See Fore Street

Castle Street: Laid out in the 1720s as an avenue with elegant town houses leading from the river to the grand house converted from the an internal gatehouse of the old castle (now King Square). By 1737 it was called both Chandos Street or Castle Street. Chandos refers to its founder, James Brydges, Duke of Chandos. Called Chandos Street on the 1735 Stratchey Map. Called ‘Great Chandos Street by the 1810s‘. However, it was also referred to as Castle Street on the 1777 Anderdon/Locke Map. Now only known as Castle Street, while the small back street of this development, for some time ‘Horn Alley’ or ‘Little Chandos Street’ is now Chandos Street.

Castlefields: Castlefields once encompassed the area north of Eastover, bounded roughly by the river on the west, Bath Road on the east, what is now the clink on the south, and a marsh on the north. These were fields that made up part of the landed estate of Bridgwater Castle (on the opposite side of the river and to the south) and would have been used to graze cattle, horses and other livestock. Over time these fields were divided up into smaller units and sold off. There were already brick and tile works on parts of the fields on the 1940s Tithe Apportionment Map, there were large clay pits by 1888 and even more by the 1904 OS maps. A football pitch appears on the only un-dug field on the 1949 RAF survey.

Catalana Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Possibly the type of pudding?

Cavallo Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Cedar Close: (Late 20th c Westonzoyland Road development – date TBC) A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Built over a field called ‘Broadland’ (TAM)

Celandine Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Chamberlin Avenue: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Not on 1939 Town Guide plan. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177)). Called Chamberlin Road on 1961 Town Guide plan. Named after a former Mayor, R. Chamberlain, 1944, 1945 and 1946. Note the difference in spelling (MS).

Chandos Street: Called Horn Alley on the 1777 Anderdon/Locke Map. Called Little Chandos Street in the 1810s. Presumably the official name was the latter, but informally known as the former. Chandos refers to the Duke of Chandos (see Castle Street, above). ‘Horn’ was often used to refer to either a steep peak or an overhanging projection, so this could be a reference to the sharp incline from the quay to the street over the former site of the castle walls.

Channi Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Chantilly Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly named after the place in France.

Chapel Street: Refers to the Wesleyan Chapel of 1818, and post-dates this. Otherwise considered part of either Dampiet Street or Binford Place.

Charolais Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the type of cow.

Charbray Road: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the type of cow.

Charford Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called Priest Meadow (TAM).

Charlton Close: Part of the later southern phase of the Sydenham estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unknown significance.

Charnwood Close: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names.

Chatham Avenue: Part of the Newtown development. Not yet built on the 1930 OS map, but built by the 1937 Whitby Directory. Unknown significance, possibly a naval reference?

Chatsword Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Chatsworth is a well-known grand house.

Chepstow Avenue: Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Built over the driveway and gardens of Hamp House.

Cherry Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Named after a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Built over a field called Broadland (TAM).

Cherry Tree Close: Shown on the 1974 Town Guide plan. A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are.

Chester Place: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of little apparent significance, presumably just used to sound grand. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Chestnut Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1967 and 1968 (Town Guide Street Plans). A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Built over a field called Chick’s Eight Acres (TAM).

Cheviot Street: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly named after the region in Scotland. Possibly refers to a type of sheep.

Chidgey Close: (late 1990s Sully’s/ Crowpill Coal Yard redevelopment – date TBC). Named after Bill Chidgey, Mayor of Bridgwater (with thanks to Molly Warren)

Chillingham Drove: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly refers to a type of cow.

Chilton Close: presumably part of the late 20th century Chilton Street development. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names, so this was an easy choice. Appears on the 1967 Town Guide plan, perhaps indicating the start of the estate.

Chilton Park: a modern motor home park, seems to be underconstruction c.2006. Named after the street. Built over a field called ‘ten acres’. Bounded on the south by the Reedmoor Rhyne (the rhyne that drains the reedy moor presumably, unless ‘reed’ is a corruption of ‘red’ referring to the local soil). Site of a clap pit, dug after 1889 and by 1904 (OS maps), for the nearby Saltlands Brick and Tile Works.

Chilton Street: Named as this street was the main route to Chilton Trinity. Chilton means something like the ‘farmstead belonging to the children’, the children probably being young nobles or princes of the royal house of Wessex. Trinity refer’s to the church’s dedication to the Holy Trinity; this also differentiates it from Chilton Polden (Ekwall). School opened 1966 (Squibbs)

Church Meadow: Part of the NDR development, complete by 2006. A meadow of this name is recorded on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, although that field is to the north opposite the church itself. This road partly occupies the site of Kidsbury Farm, a moated medieval manor house, which Saxon origins in the early middle ages. This historic farm was demolished without any archaeology conducted to explore its origins.

*Church Passage: The passageway to get to St Mary’s Chruch from the High Street. Also known as Danger’s Ope, an ‘ope’ meaning the same as ‘opening’ or ‘passage’. Mr Danger owned the adjoining property (which?). Hooper’s building on the west side used to have a room above the passage, and the remains of this can still be seen in the brickwork. Mr Allan recalled knowing a woman who had lived in the room as a child, who remembered it to have been very draughty. This room was probably removed when the building on the east side of the passage was built in 1892 for Mr Curry (Gibson). Local stories suggests there are human remains buried below the alleyway, found occasionally by workmen.

Church Path: Named for the footpath that leads from valley slope of Kidsbury, across the Wembdon Levels to St George’s Church
Church Road. Built by Pollards. Two phases, with a terrace at the top of the slope, called ‘Newton Terrace West’ by 1904, and semi-detached houses in the 1930s. The top two and bottom two southern semi-detached houses were both built by the 1930 OS map. Remainder built by the 1937 Whitby Directory.

Church Road: Wembdon. The road to St George’s Church, following the course of the Wembdon/Crowpill Rhyne, now culverted over until the park. Seems to be part of a very old causeway across the marsh, leading between Wembdon Hill and Crowpill. The section between Crossfield Close and the church was Wembdon Common

Church Street: Part of the 1840s St John’s Church development, to provide access to the church from Eastover, presumably involving the demolition of one or two tenements. It is unclear if the intention was originally to continue the street along the Leggar to the Bristol Road.

Citrine Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named after a shade of yellow.

*Clare Street: This street had several medieval names, which enter the record from 1321: Orlove, Ordlove, Horloke, Horlokkes, and ‘the north street called Orlove Street‘, all of which stem from the Ordlof or Orloc family who presumably lived there in the 1260s (BBA, nos 8, 92, 125, 159 etc and 235). The broad area where Orlove Street met the High Street and to where it met Penel Street (Market Street) became known as Penel Orlieu – Clare Street itself is recorded as Penel & Orlieu Street on the 1735 Stratchey Map. Called Back Lane (ie the back lane to the High Street) on the 1810s and 1840s Town Plans. Called Back Street on the 1889 OS maps. Called Clare Street on the 1904 OS Map. Referred to as Clare Street in a number of documents dating to 1893 (SHC DD/CH/137/2; A/CMY/1)  The significance of the name is a mystery, unless it is a corruption of ‘Clarence’, referring to the hotel that backs into it, in the same way Angel Crescent was named after the Inn that occupied the Clarence site.

Clare Terrace: Previously Honeysuckle Alley (MS). Demolished for Angel Crescent (expand). Takes it name from Clare Street. Honeysuckle will refer to the plant, which presumably grew in the area before it was more intensively developed. For most of the middle ages and early modern period, the areas further away from the High Street were occupied by gardens and only a few cottages.

Clarence Terrace: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Presumably named after the former hotel in town on the High Street, although given the rootless names used elsewhere on this estate it may be a reference to Clarence House, and intended to sound grand. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Claremont Grove: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) unclear significance.

Clarks Road: (late 20th c. development – date TBC) The site of the Clark’s Redgate Factory.

Clipper Close: (late 20th c. development – date TBC) Built over part of the side of the former Clark’s Redgate Factory – the road is named after Clark’s Clippers, one of their show brands (with thanks to Duncan McGeown).

The Clink: Modern, 1980s road (date TBC), over laying an old GWR railway line and sidings, which was referred to as the Clink. The name is assumed to refer to either the clinker from the steam engines, or to cement clinker from the adjoining cement works. Other stories relate to the noise shunting engines, or of the noise of the furniture worn by cavalry horses kept here during the First World War, although these are less likely. The name was probably also a playful invocation of a slang word for prison.

Clover Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Cloverton Drive: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) unclear significance.

Coffee House Lane: See Queen Street and Court Street

Coleridge Green: Bridgwater’s first Roundabout. Attached to Coleridge Road, built 1927-8.

Coleridge Road: Named after the Romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who lived at Nether Stowey for a time and occasionally preached in Bridgwater’s Unitarian Chapel. This road was laid and built in 1927-8, as part of the Newtown Estate by Pugsley of Bristol (Locke)

Coleridge Square: Part of the Newtown development, built sometime between 1929 and 1930, appearing on the 1930s OS map. A Roman coin of Constantine II (336-337AD) was found here, with others being found in the Newtown Estate.

College Way: The way to Bridgwater College (laid out 1980s? TBC). The fields this was built over were intensely used as clay pits in the 1930s and 1940s (OS and RAF).

Colley Lane: Originally a lane connecting St John Street of 1840 and the much older Salmon Lane, which ran from the river to join Westonzoyland Road via Penzoy Avenue. Unclear if Colley lane predated St John Street – perhaps as access to fields – but would have become much more important as the railway cut Salmon Lane in two (modern Colley Lane south, and ‘Old Weston Zoyland Road’/Penzoy Avenue). Now Colley Lane includes a portion of old Salmon lane on its south side. Two fields to the east were named ‘at Colley Lane’ and these appear to pre-date the railway line, being cut apart by it (TAM). Name of unclear significance. Possibly from the Old English ‘coll’ for hill (ie Brent-Knoll), the Old Welsh for Hazels or perhaps (most likely) ‘coal-y’ as is coal like, possibly in reference to the railway line after all.

Collingwood Court: (1980s Docks development – date TBC) Named after famous admirals of the Royal Navy, keeping with the notion of ‘Admirals Landing’. Admiral Collingwood was successor to Nelson at Trafalgar, so this court is a counterpart to Nelson Court.

Colmer Road: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names.

Condell Close: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance, possibly Henry Condell the Shakespearian actor. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names. The northern part is built over a field called Escott’s Marshes (TAM)

Connemara Street: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly named after the type of pony.

The Copse: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. There never seems to have been a copse here, just floodplain fields surrounded by willows.

Coral Avenue: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Cormorant Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, not yet built in 1968, but presumably very soon after (Town Guide, 1968). Unknown significance, presumably just a reference to the bird type. Built over a field called ‘Montacues’.

Cornborough Place: Date TBC. Later extension. Name of unknown significance.

Cornflower Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

*Cornhill: A very old name, presumably related to a grain market here. Called ‘the Cornchepyng’ in 1343 (BBA, no.133) and ‘Cornhulle’ in 1361 (BBA, no.192). Just ‘Market Place’ on Stratchey’s 1735 Map.

Coronation Road: Built between the 1904 and 1930 OS maps, most likely in the earlier part of that span, to connect Wembdon Road to the new Halesleigh Road, which has started by 1904. A field called ‘Dingley’s’ in the 1840s, the garden of Wembdon House on the 1889 OS Town Plan. The name presumably celebrates the coronation of George V in 1911, which probably dates the completion of the street and houses.

Cosmos Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Cothelstone Close: Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1968 and 1971 Town Guide plans. Refers to Cothelstone on the Quantocks, which means ‘the farmstead of Cuthwulf’ (Ekwall)

Cotswold Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably refers to the hills. Built over a field called ‘Hawk’s Nest’ (TAM).

Cotton Patch Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Unclear if cotton can grow on marshland?

Countess Avenue: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles.

Court Street: The date of this street is unclear, as it crosses a path over the line of the old castle wall and over the moat. Possible seventeenth or eighteenth century. An entrance if not a full street is shown on the 1735 Stratchey Map. Along with Queen Street, this was once called Coffee House Lane. The coffeehouse would have been a very important establishment in the town, for gentlemen to meet and discuss ideas, although its exact location is unknown. By the 1888 OS Town Plan, Court Street and the eastern portion of modern Queen Street were Queen Street, while the western portion was still Coffee House Lane. Called Court Street by the time of the 1904 OS Map. The name Court Street refers to the County Court House at the top of the street, built in 1824, so the name ‘Court Street’ may have been in unofficial use before 1904.

Courtway Avenue: Later, lower Sydenham estate development. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unknown significance.

Cowslip Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Cranbourne Close: late 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names.

Cranleigh Gardens: Designed by Basil Cottam September 1894 (unnamed at the time) (Gibson A\CMY/106). Name of unknown significance. Part of Salmon Lane Brick and Tile Works on 1889 OS Map.

Cranleigh Road: Runs from the Salmon Parade/Broadway end up until the bend where it meets Cranleigh Gardens and part of that development. Previously the site of a brick kiln, which sttood directly in front of the Lime Kiln Inn.

Crestfield Avenue: late: 20th century (1980s?) Chilton Street development. Unknown significance. All the streets on this development appear to have taken ‘c’ names. Built over a field called Escott’s Marshes (TAM)

Cridlands Meadow: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unclear significance, possibly another name for the field it was built over, although it is recorded as ‘Four Acres’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Cristata Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Cromwell Road: Built sometime between the 1930 OS map and the 1937 Whitby Directory. Presumably refers to Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell served under General Fairfax during the storm of Bridgwater in 1645, and both men were nearly drowned while crossing the Parrett at Dunwear, being hit by the Bore.

Cross Rifles: The junction of the Bath and Bristol Roads at Monmouth Street. Also known as The Cannon. Cross Rifles is the name of the adjoining pub from which the junction takes its name. The first recorded landlord was Elizabeth Davies in 1866 (Williams). This was not long after the formation of Bridgwater’s Rifle Volunteer Corps, which had a rifle range near Dunball. The pub was possibly a popular haunt after a day at the firing range. The third recorded publican, James Hurford (1822-1898), who managed the pub from before 1871, had previously served as a sergeant in the Royal Marines during the Crimean War. The Cannon refers to a Russian artillery piece, taken during the Crimean War which was kept here from 1889 to 1940, and a replacement can now be seen on the roundabout. Although Bristol Road dates to the early nineteenth century, this part of Monmouth Street was known as Keyling’s Cross. The name ‘Kelyng’, ‘Keling’ appears several times in medieval records associated with the town, the earliest in about the 1260s (Dilks no.7), so it is not a surprise to find a feature associated with someone of this family. Whether this was a trading cross, preaching cross or a roadside cross is unclear. Shown on the first Boundary Commission map of 1835. Called ‘Keelings toll gate’ on the second. The first mention of the cross (and possibly only mention, aside from nineteenth century boundary maps) comes from the borough charter of 1468, which has a perambulation of the town’s legal boundary – the Keyling Cross in the east, then south to Lyme Bridge, then across to Matthew’s Field, then north to Crowpill, then back to Keyling. These features were added to the 1830s boundary commissioners’ maps, although these may have retroactively added the medieval names from the charter to the known nineteenth century borough limits and made a best guess in marrying the two up.

Cross View Rise. Wembdon. Still fields on the 1948 RAF photographic survey. Modern development – date TBC. Built over a field called ‘the acre’ (TAM). The footpath from Church Lane appears on the 1904 OS Map, although not on the 1889 – only the old east west path at the top.

Crossacre. Wembdon. Built over ‘Cross Acre Orchard’, which appears on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. Name of unclear significance, either the acre was the shape of a cross at some point (not by 1840) – possibly the site of a medieval cross? The north most houses on Church Lane were built by the 1946 RAF survey. The rest of the development is modern, built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974)

Crossfield Close. Wembdon. Modern – date TBC. The name seems to take its lead from Crossacre.

Crowcombe Walk: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. One of a series of street names on this estate to come from local villages. This is the ‘coombe’ ie valley settlement, frequented by crows.

Crowpill Lane: Crowpill Lane is something of a mystery, being within the site of Bridgwater Castle, and not actually leading to Crowpill. Crowpill itself is another mystery: the settlement is usually taken to be where the causeway over the Wembdon Levels from St George’s Church met Chilton Street. However, at the same time, Crowpill House was situated much to the south, behind Valetta Place. A ‘pill’ is derived from an Old Welsh word meaning creek, and in Somerset usually refers to the mouth of a stream into a larger river. So Crowpill is possibly the inlet frequented by crows. Exactly where this pill was though is hard to see now: it was where the Crowpill Rhyne met the river. There was another pill between Crowpill House and Valetta Place, which only confuses things.

Crusader Close: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. Of of a group of names celebrating local carnival clubs: Crusaders Carnival Club.

D

Daffodil Place: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Daisey Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

*Dampiet Street: The Dam-yett street, the way to the dam (which was attached to the town’s mill in what is now Blake Street). Dampiet seems to have originally included King Street and Blake Street as a broad ‘y’ shape. First mentioned in 1344 (BBA, no.139).

Dampiet Ward: See King Street

Danesboro Road: Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate: appears on the 1961 Town Guide Plan under construction. Name of unknown significance.

Danger’s Ope: See Church Passage

Davies Close: Part of the Hamp Developments. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Named after Jack Davies, labour councillor.

Daws Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC). Many of the roads on this estate were named after notable Bridgwater civic leaders. Identity TBC.

Deacon Road: Part of the middle phase of the Sydenham estate. Not on 1939 Town Guide plan. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Name of unknown significance – possibly Mayor W. Deacon, who served 1925-7.

Deal Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Possibly a reference to Deal Lumber.

Devonshire Street: Post 1840s St John Street development -date TBC. – not on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, or the 1851 Round Map. Appears on the 1889 OS Map. Name of unknown significance. Either the Duke of the County?

Devonshire Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Unclear significance. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Dewberry Avenue: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Dexter Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Dexter is the Latin term for the right hand side.

Docks: Bridgwater Docks or Floating Harbour. Opened 25 March 1841. Closed 1971. Converted to a Marina in the 1980s.

Dorset Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Counterpart to Somerset Road, being West Country shires.

Dovai: NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unknown significance. Possibly a reference to Walter of Douai, whose forename gives the Water in Bridwater. Built over a field called ‘Tuttles’.

Downhall Drive. Wembdon. The drive to Down Hall House. Originally a straight lane north of Church Lane to the old quarry behind the big house, shown on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. By the 1889 OS map the lane had changed to a curving driveway leading to ‘Elm Grove House’, another name for Down Hall, or at least the west most portion of it. ‘Down’ was presumably the surname of the person who built the house (TBC).

Drakes Close: (1980s Docks development – date TBC) Named after famous admirals of the Royal Navy, keeping with the notion of ‘Admirals Landing’. Named after Sir Francis Drake.

The Drove: A name referring to trackways along which livestock could be taken. Unclear how old this feature is, and whether it pre-dates Bristol Road, or is part of that development with the Leggar and Union Street.

Duchess Close: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles. Built over a field called Waverlands (TAM).

Duke Street: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles. Part built over the site of an orchard on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Dukes Mead: Modern addition to the Hamp Estate (date TBC). Name ‘the meadow of the duke’ is of unknown significance – no apparent historical precedent, presumably just made up to sound grand.

+Dunball: Old English for ‘prominent hill’ (Ekwall)

Duncombe Close: Modern Bower development, date TBC. Name of unclear significance to Bridgwater, Duncombe not being in Somerset – possibly refers to the place in Lancashire.

Dunkery Road: Mid-20th century Quantock Road development, date TBC. Named after the village on the Quantocks, which comes from the Old Welsh for ‘hillfort on the rock’ (Ekwall).

Durleigh Close: A modern development, date TBC, built over the site of the old Vicarage of St Mary’s Church, dating to c.1851. Takes its name from Durleigh Road.

Durleigh Hill: Durleigh means something like the ‘wood frequented by deer’ (Ekwall). A very old trackway leading to Road.

*Durleigh Road: The road to Durleigh: A very old trackway leading west of the town. Shown as ‘Enmore Road’ on early maps. On the 1889 OS map there is very little development past Northfields, save farms, St Mary’s Vicarage and West India House (which is also on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map). Secondary School built in 1937 (Squibbs)

Dyke’s Court: North of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Presumably named after the owner and/or builder. Still standing on the 1930s OS map.

E

Earls Close: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles. Built over a field called ‘Waverlands’ (TAM).

*East Quay: First described as ‘By the Were’ in 1366, a reference to the tide mill later converted into a dry dock (BBA, no.238). Bowling Green on Stratchey’s 1735 Map. Presumably refered to as East Quay from the early nineteenth century, when the east side of the river was first utilised as an additional quayside, after the demolition of a houses adjoining the old bridge, c.1800 Called East Quay on the 1889 OS Map. East Quay seems to have been considered to stretch far along the river bank as Barham’s Brickyard was referred to as on East Quay.

Eastern Avenue: the first portion of the Bower Estate, south most portion shown on the 1974 Town Guide plan.

*Eastover: Just meaning the street in the east, over the bridge. Called ‘Estovere’ in 1357 (BBA, no.184). Also called ‘ beyond the Bridge’ in the 1260s (BBA, no.23), ‘twixt the Hospital [of St John]and the Bridge’ in 1317 (BBA, no.80) or ‘east of the Bridge’ in 1326 (BBA, no.107)

Eastwood Close: Later part of the Sydenham estate – date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Presumably named in honour of someone, as there was no east wood in this area, being mostly marshland. The site of an orchard on the 1888 OS map.

Edinburgh Road: Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey, part of the second phase of the Rhode Lane Estate. As many of the names of the estate are from royal titles, this street is presumably a reference to the Duke of Edinburgh, a title granted to Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark in November 1948, which suggests when this street may have been nearly completed.

Edward Street: Part of the 1840s/1850s St John Street developments (date TBC). – not on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, or the 1851 Round Map. Appears on the 1889 OS Map. Named after Edward Sealey who owned much of the land in that area (MS). Site of an iron and brass foundry on the 1889 OS map.

Eight Acre Meadow: Part of the NDR development, under construction in 2006. Named after a nearby field, although not actually built on that field (which is the site of the allotments), ironically this road is partly built over Church Meadows, unlike the street on the same estate called Church Meadows.

Elder Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the tree type.

Eldergrove Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Eliza Way: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett. Named after a trow of 54 tons, built at Runcorn in 1865. Registered Bridgwater 1898. Captain J.William 1920. Registered as a barge 1936. Broken up 1949 (Reference Index) Unclear who Eliza was this ship was named after.

Elizabeth Way: (late 20th c. Sydenham estate addition – date TBC) Along with adjoining Jubilee Close, this is presumably a reference to Queen Elizabeth II’s silver jubilee of 1977.

Elmgrove Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Elmside Road: Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Part of the second phase of the Rhode Lane Estate. Hamp Wood on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, open fields on the 1889 OS map.

Elmwood Avenue: Takes its name from Elmwood House, which dated to the 1850s, although that house was a little distance away on Hamp Street. The lane was laid out between the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map, and the pre-1854 Town Plan, linking Hamp Street to the New Taunton Road. It occupied the site of an older rope walk, shown on the Tithe Map. The adjoining Browne’s Pond was also dug between those dates. Called Browne’s Drive on the 1889, 1904 and 1930 OS Maps. Houses built between 1930 and 1949 (dates TBC).

Embden Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the place in Germany.

Emerald Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Esperia Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly refers to the part of Italy.

Evesham Drive: Part of the Wills Road Estate. Date TBC. Name of unknown significance.

F

Fairfax Close: Later addition to Fairfax Road – not in the first phase shown in 1946. Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built near the site of a medieval windmill.

Fairfax Road: The northern portion meeting Wyndham is shown in the 1939 Town Guide, likewise in the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. The southern portion is not yet under construction by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown complete on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. The name refers to Sir Thomas Fairfax, who stormed Bridgwater in 1645. His adversary was Colonel Wyndham, whose street is a counterpart to this one.

Farthing Road: Part of the Wills Road estate, date TBC. Most names on this estate are named after Bridgwater worthies. This one is named after Walt Farthing, mayor and MP (for Frome) who lived in Blacklands.

Fenner’s Buildings: Court on the north side of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Presumably named after the owner and/or builder. Seems to have been demolished by the time of the 1904 OS map.

Fernleigh Avenue: Built over the site of several orchards (TAM and 1889 OS). The east had been begun by the 1930 OS map and shown completed by the 1949 RAF survey. Name of unknown significance.

Feversham Avenue: Part of the 1930s Newtown development. Not yet begun on the 1930 OS map, although Kendale Road shows the anticipatory junction. Shown complete on the 1949 RAF survey. Name of unknown significance. Extended to Trinity Way in circa 2001 with the NDR development.

Fig Tree Crescent: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Fir Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Florence Court: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy. Built over a field called ‘Rag’ (TAM).

*Fore Street: Fore meant preeminent in the same way as ‘High’ in High Street (think High Lord Admiral) and was a common West County means of indicating a town’s most important street. Once part of what was considered the ‘Great Street’ or ‘Great Royal Street’ which ran from the West Gate (Penel Orlieu) to the town Bridge, via the Cornhill, and described as such in the 1260s (BBA, nos 16, 21, 24 and 37). Even called High Street in a document of 1355 (BBA, no 176) In 1540 John Leland considered High and Fore Street to be the same, despite being disjointed by the market place/Cornhill. First recorded as ‘Forstret’ in 1367 (BBA, no.237). Also described variously as ‘Twixt Church and Bridge’ in 1355 (BBA, no.176), or ‘Twixt Bridge and Market’ in 1355 (BBA, no.176), or ‘Twixt Bridge and Chuchyard’ in 1373 (BBA, no.283). The row of properties on the north side of the street was known as ‘Castle Ditch’ by 1367, indication that this portion of the moat had been built over by this time (BBA, nos 235, 283) – another document mentioning a half burgage on the west side of castle ditch in 1317 (presumaby in the Cornhill area) might suggest earlier, although it is not clear if this may have just abutted the moat (BBA, no.77).

Forester Close: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett. Two ships bore the name on the river: one recorded in 1920, the other, the Royal Forester, is recorded 1848-1866 (Reference Index).

Forsynthia Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Four Acre Meadow: Part of the NDR development, complete by 2006. Takes its name from the field it was built over, recorded on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Foxglove Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Frampton Road: Part of the Wills Road estate, date TBC. Most names on this estate are named after Bridgwater worthies. Named by Brian Smedley in honour of in honour of two famous Framptons: 1. Nicolas Frampton -The Hedge Priest vicar of St Mary’s during the Peasants revolut of 1381 and Robert Frampton the Dockers Union leader during the 1896 Brickyard strike.

Frederick Road: Northern portion shown in the 1939 Town Guide. Partially built on the 1946 RAF survey. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Built over a field called ‘Mile Stone Six Acres’ (TAM). Probably named after the Cardiff-based builders of Frederick and Trevor Moss (with thanks to Heather Prosser)

Friarn Avenue: Built 1934, when part of the medieval Friary buildings were discovered. Takes its name from Friarn Street, which in turn took its name from the friary this avenue was partially built over.

Friarn Lawn: Takes its name from Friarn Street, lawn because there was a large private garden to the front, now built over by the Broadway. Built as a private street for the new terrace, built circa 1820. Once terminated in a grand house called ‘The Friars’.

*Friarn Street: The street with the Franciscan Friary. The Friary was founded in 1246. First mentioned, ‘Frerenstrete’, in 1298 (BBA, no.44). Possibly called the Wayhur before the Friary was founded (see Horsepond Lane). Parts were also referred to as ‘twixt South Gate and Friars Minor’ in 1345 and ‘twixt West Gate and Friars’ in 1361 (BBA, nos 143 and 193). Part demolished for the Broadway, 1963 (Blake 2)

*Frog Lane: Mostly destroyed by Binford House, now Blake Gardens, a portion survives as Binford Place. The summer house in Blake Gardens stands on the site of the former lane. ‘Frog’ was a common epitaph for medieval placed that were unusually wet and boggy – unsurprising given the proximity to the river.

Furlongs Avenue: Built on the site of Hamp Wood on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, then open fields by the 1889 OS map. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. A furlong was a common unit of distance and often given to field names.

Furze Close: Built over the site of the former Girl’s Grammar School. Modern, date TBC. Named by Jan Farrance after the head of the former school, Miss Furze, who succeeded Phillips and Nicholls, who are also commemorated by near by roads. (with thanks to Molly Warren and Dawn Ferguson).

G

Galloway Drive: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name of Unclear significance.

Gardenia Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Garganey Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the type of duck.

*George Street: named after George’s Inn/The George Inn, which stretched between this lane and St Mary Street. Bridgwater’s premier medieval Inn, first mentioned in April 1380 (BBA, no.337). Early spellings include Jorgesen, Georgeshyn and just Georges (BBA). The Inn was in turn named after St George, who was popular in the country following the third crusade, with other local dedications with a chapel in St Mary’s Church, the parish church in Wembdon and an annual fair in that parish. It is often said the name George was often given to inns set up to help facilitate the movement of Crusader Knights, although this could be apocryphal. Called George Lane on 1735 Stratchey Map and the 1840s town plan. George Street by the 1889 OS map.

Gloucester Road: Part of the 1930s Hamp Estate: does not appear on the 1930 OS Map. Road appears in the 1939 Town Guide. Complete by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey. As most of the streets on this estate were named after royal titles, this street presumably commemorates Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (1900-1974), who was given that title in 1928. Crosses the site of several old fields, including Dwellands, High Seven Acres and Hedgerow Field (TAM).

Gold’s Buildings: Also ‘Gould’s Buildings’. Accessed from the northside of Northgate. Presumably named after the builder/owner. The surname ‘Gould’ is more likely, as a family of that name were active in the neighbourhood. This court seems to be standing on the 1824 Water Supply Map, but certainly in evidence on the c.1854 Town Plan. Mostly demolished by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Gooch Close: (later extension of Sydenham – late 20th c. – brownfield redevelopment? – date TBC) Name of unknown significance, presumably in honour of a local dignitary. Appears to be allotments on the 1946 RAF survey.

Gordon Terrace: The approach to Gordon Terrace was the entryway to the old St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Chapel, which was built in 1846, not long after St John Street was laid out. Aside from the chapel, the site is shown as a field on the 1889 OS map. Possibly contemporary with Cranleigh Gardens of 1894. Given the timeframe, this terrace may be named in honour Charles George Gordon, one of the most celebrated ‘heros of Empire’, who was killed in 1885 at Khartoum.

Gorki Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Grange Drive: Named after the old Vicarage of St Mary’s Church, built in 1851 and demolished recently in (year TBC), which was adjacent and now the site of ‘Great Oak Close’. Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate: appears on the 1961 Town Guide Plan. Called ‘Grange Close’ then.

Grasmere Close: Wembdon. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974). Other names in this development had Cumbrian or north western origins, such as Brantwood and Risedale (both Cumbria), Silverdale (Lancashire). Unclear relationship to Wembdon.

Greatwood Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) Most of the streets on this estate where named in honour of notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Grebe Close, Court and Road: Modern, date TBC. Built over nineteenth century clay pits. Grebes are a type of water bird, so perhaps the name reflects wetland nature of the site before development.

The Green: Connects Sunnybank Road and Furlongs Avenue. Built on the site of Hamp Wood on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, then open fields by the 1889 OS map. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey.

The Green: Wembdon. ‘The Green’ development, a £2.4 million project to provide community facilities is in the process of turning the old Kidsbury Commons into a wildflower and nature park and expanding the old playing fields. Given planning permission in 2012 and completed July 2017. The park has been extended and two cricket pitches have been laid out, along with nets for cricket practice and multi-use games areas. A grand pavilion has been built, providing changing rooms, performance spaces and meeting rooms. Takes its name from the initial project name ‘Wembdon Green Wedge’ given by Sedgemoor District Council. Wembdon’s original ‘village green’, the Common runs alongside Church Lane and alongside the Crowpill Rhyne.

Greenacre: Wembdon. Built over fields called ‘Nine Acres’, ‘Lower Seven Acres’ and ‘The Acre’ (TAM), so Greenacre preserves something of this while also riffing on the much older ‘Crossacre’ nearby. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974)

Griffen Close: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. Of of a group of names celebrating local carnival clubs. Griffens Carnival Club was founded in 1968.

H

Haggett Close: Part of the Wills Road estate, date TBC. Most names on this estate are named after Bridgwater worthies. Most likely refers to F. G. HAGGETT, mayor of Bridgwater during the First World War.

Halesleigh Road: Named after Halesleigh Tower (now the Quantock Pub), built by Mr Thomas Clarke, who named it as he purchased the land for it off of the Hales family, leigh meaning grove or glade (Metford; Ekwall). The new road occupies four old fields, the southern two being the location of a barn. A cow pit stood in the very centre (now under number 86) and one on the north west corner, along with some standing stones of unknown significance at the western end of number 85’s garden. The first portion of the road seems to be under construction on the 1904 OS map, when the easter part of the road had been built,. but only six eastern most houses standing on the southern side. At the time access was only from Victoria Road, although a footpath along the line of the later western part of the street led to the Jam Factory Lane. Later joined to Provident Place and Coronation Road.

Halsway: A later phase of the Sydenham estate, still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unknown significance.

Halswell Close: Part of the 1960s West Street redevelopment. Most likely named after the old Halswell Lane, which was nearby and connected Albert Street to West Street. The lane, in turn, was named after a pub on the north eastern corner with West Street. That in turn was named after Halswell House, and the pub was presumably part of the many scattered properties of the estate.

Halyard Drive: NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unclear significance.

Hamilton Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Unclear significance – the Hamiltons were a powerful Scottish noble family. Built over a field called ‘Hither Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Yonder Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Hamp Avenue: Once part of Hamp Lane/Street, see below.

Hamp Brook Way: Open fields on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Takes its name from the adjoining Brook.

Hamp Green Rise: A lane connecting Taunton Road to Hamp Street, primarily as a driveway for Hamp Green House a sixteenth century manor house. Shown on all the surviving maps of the area, although appears to be a private gated road on the 1889 OS Town Plan and on the 1904 OS map. The name ‘Hamp Green Rise’ appears on the 1930 OS map, by which time the modern houses had been built.

*Hamp Street: In 959 King Eadwig of Wessex granted to a man called Ceolward property at Ham on the west bank of the Parrett, which King Aethelred gave to Athelney abbey in 1009. Also referred to as Hamme and later Hamp, the ‘p’ often being added to English words to make them easier to pronounce (Dampiet, Southampton, Thompson etc). The name simply means ‘settlement’ or ‘village’, indcating how early a name it was, not having to be distinguished from anything else. Hamp Street was once contagious with Hamp Ward, making one continuous route from the South Gate of Bridgwater to Rhode Lane, probably without any other connection to old Taunton Road along the riverbank. Called Hamp Lane on the 1835 Borough Boundary Map. Called Hamp Street on the 1840s Town Plan.

*Hamp Ward: A route way between Hamp Street to Bridgwater’s South Gate, now surviving as the footpath alongside Browne’s Pond and alongside the supermarket car park. Ward is probably a medieval designation for a wider area, a ward being the charge of a warden, who was responsible for collecting local taxes there – we find mention of Hamp being one of the hamlets contributing to the new spire of St Mary’s Church in 1366-7 (BBA, no.238). ‘Dampiet Ward’ (King Street) is a historical parallel, so perhaps ‘ward’ became a designation for a lesser part of a more important road.

Hampstead Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after a fancy part of London.

Hampton Close: (modern development, date TBC) One of a series of roads in a new estate to be named after historic palaces. Built over a field called ‘Southovers’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Harlequin Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named in honour of the carnival club. The Harlequins were formed in 1972 in Ilminster.

Hatton Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called Priest Meadow (TAM).

Hawkridge Road: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. The name means the ridge frequented by a hawk. Built over the old Queenswood (TAM)

Hawthorn Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Haygrove Road: A very old lane leading south of Durleigh Road that connected three farms, terminating at the Durleigh Brook, now sadly truncated by modern development. Called Haygrove Lane on the 1889, 1904 and 1930 OS maps. Haygrove means ‘enclosure in the grove’ indicating it was surrounded by woodland in the early middle ages. Haygrove was the principle agricultural estate of Bridgwater Castle.

Hazelwood Drive: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Heathcombe Road: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. The name means heath in a valley (Ekwall).

Heather Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1967 and 1968 (Town Guide Street Plans). One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Herbert’s Court: South of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Presumably named after the owner and/or builder. Still standing on the 1930s OS map.

Herds Walk: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name refers to this.

Hestercombe Close: Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate. Showing laid out but unnamed on the 1968 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages.

*High Street: perhaps the most common street name in England, meaning the town’s principle street. Once part of what was considered the ‘Great Street’ or ‘Great Royal Street’ which ran from the West Gate (Penel Orlieu) to the town Bridge, via the Cornhill, and described as such in the 1260s (BBA, nos 16, 21, 24 and 37). The section now referred to as High Street is first mentioned in 1331 (BBA, no.116), although High Street was also applied to Penel Orlieu in 1295 (BBA, no.38) and Fore Street in 1355 (BBA, no 176). There was once a row of buildings up the High Street from the Cornhill to the Mansion House, known as the Island. The streets either side of this were therefore also called North Street (first mentioned in the 1260s, BBA, no.12) and South Street (first mentioned in 1303, BBA, no.54). Due to the number of butchers working there, the wider area on the north side from the Mansion House eastwards was known as the Shambles.

Highgrove Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) Most of the streets on this estate where named in honour of notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Hillgrove Avenue: See Kidsbury Road

Hillgrove Close: Side lane off Kidsbury Road, preserving an older name for it. Presumably named after the large Hillgrove House, which had been built between the 1889 and 1904 OS maps. There is no older precedent for this name, ‘Hillgrove’ not appearing on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map, when these fields were just ‘three acres’ and ‘four acres’.

Hilliers Buildings: a court off of the west of Monmouth Street, down a small lane. As with most courts presumably named after the builder/owner. Appear on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Demolished in the 1960s (with thanks to Paul Richards).

Hills Court: South of Eastover. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan. Presumably named after the owner and/or builder. Still standing on the 1930s OS map.

Holford Road: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. Extended west on the 1968 Town Guide plan. Shown complete on the 1974 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. Holford means ‘hollow ford’ or ‘ford in a deep valley (Ekwall). Built over the old Queenswood (TAM)

Hollow Lane: Wembdon. Three explanations are possible. The story the author was told as a child was that the lane was literally hollow because of the tunnel passing below the side-lane for the adjoining quarry. The second explanation is that the lane is a ‘Holloway’, a ‘hollow’ (sunken) ‘weg’ (path). Holloways can be found throughout Britain and many had their origins as substantial pre-historic estate boundaries. This is more than possible with Hollow Lane. Although not quite as sunken as Moore’s Lane, Hollow Lane does not particularly lead anywhere – it has two sharp left and right junctions at its bottom, suggesting its primary purpose was as boundary and only used as a trackway as an afterthought – and it neatly divides the north of Wembdon hill into two. The third possible meaning of the name is Hollow as in Holy (think Hallow’s Eve/Halloween). Whereas Moore’s Lane leads to Skimmerton Lane at the top of the hill, Hollow Lane reaches the summit at the old Holy Well (also called the Hollowell or St John’s Well). The Hollow Lane might have been some sort of holy route leading to the holy well – either in medieval or even pre-historic times, depending on when the well became important for the community, which is unknown for certain. The springs at Bath, Wells and Glastonbury were sacred for thousands of years pagan and Christian, and Wembdon may have been similar in this pattern (Wembdon)

Holly Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Hollyhock Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Homberg Way: The Northern Distributor Road (or NDR), built in the years around 2001. Named after the town in Germany that Bridgwater is twinned with.

Honeysuckle Alley: See Clare Terrace

Hopewell Street: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Unclear Significance: Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett?

Hornbeam Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

*Horsey Lane: Horsey is a very ancient settlement, and is Old English for ‘Horse Island’ (Ekwall) recalling a time when it was either an island in the marsh, or an island between channels of the River Parrett. There was a prosperous village here with its own chapel in the middle ages, but was eventually deserted. Horsey Lane originally ran towards the river and Horsey Pill, being bound on each side by Rhynes to help drainage, later being sliced in two by the Bristol Road and Bristol and Exeter Railway.

*Horsepond Lane: The oldest recorded named street in Bridgwater, first mentioned on 6 February 1268 (BBA, no.14). Probably laid out in 1200 with the rest of the medieval street plan, and possibly the name for the rest of Friarn Street before that name caught on after the establishment of the Friary in 1246, in similar manner of Dampiet Street referring to the dam at the bottom of Blake Street. Originally rendered as ‘Wayhure’, which was interchangeable with Horse-pond or Horse-pool, essentially a pool on the Durleigh Brook and somewhere for the townsfolk to water their horses. The opposite side of Durleigh Brook was later the site of a tannery.

Hughes Close: (later extension of Sydenham – late 20th c. – brownfield redevelopment? – date TBC) Name of unknown significance, presumably in honour of a local dignitary. Appears to be allotments on the 1946 RAF survey.

I

Imperial Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Indigo Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Possibly just refers to the vivid shade of blue.

Inwood Road: Wembdon. Name of unknown significance, although presumably related to nearby woodland. This road takes its name from Inwood House, reputed to be a pretty eighteenth-century house, shown on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, although no pictures seem to survive of it. The road was built over its site by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974), although a portion of the front garden wall survives in the open ground by the junction. A very old drovers’ lane that adjoined the grounds of the house partially survives as the back lane of the southern row of homes.

Irene Close: (modern development, date TBC) One of a group of names remembering Bridgwater ships, including Petrel, Rosevean and Severn. The Ketch Irene was built in Bridgwater in 1907 and the last surviving and working Bridgwater-built vessel. The ship was named after Irene Symons, daughter of the brick-making merchant who commissioned her, on behalf of the company Colthurst-Symons (Reference Index p.30). Built over fields called Pill’s or Poll’s Door on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Ivory Road: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Ivygrove Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types or groves, this one being named after the climbing plant.

J

Jacob’s Land: See Blake Place.

Jade Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Hither Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Yonder Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Janson Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) unknown significance.

Japonica Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Jasmin Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Jewel Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Jubilee Close: (late 20th c. Sydenham estate addition – date TBC) Along with adjoining Elizabeth Way, this is presumably a reference to the silver jubilee of 1977.

Juniper Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Jutland Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named either after the part of Denmark, or for the battle there in 1916 – at least three Bridgwater men were killed there.

K

Keltings: Wembdon. Modern (1980s? TBC). Built over Mount Radford Orchard and adjoining the site of the medieval Holy Well. Possibly named after Louis Kelting OBE (1903-1978 – see page 3 of the research guide), Engineer to the Drainage Board in the War years and later. The enlargement of the King Sedgemoor Drain as water storage for ROF was nicknamed ‘Kelting’s Cut’.

Keyling’s/Keeling’s Cross: See Cross Rifles

Kendale Road: Named after Bridgwater’s first mayor (1469-1473 – Jarman). This road was laid and built in 1927-8, as part of the Newtown Estate by Pugsley of Bristol (Locke).

Kensington Gardens: Modern Bower estate – date TBC. Named after the part of London, no obvious connection to Bridgwater, presumably the result of the developer seeking a prestigious and marketable name.

Kent Avenue: Part of an old lane, redeveloped in the 1930s. Called ‘Row’s Lane’ on the 1835 Borough Boundary Map. As most new roads on this estate were named for royal titles, this probably refers to Prince George, Duke of Kent, who was given the title in 1934, which may help date the redevelopment. Road appears in the 1939 Town Guide. Housing shown complete on the 1946 RAF survey.

Kerry Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Kestrel Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1967 and 1968 (Town Guide Street Plans). Presumably named after the bird type.

*Kidsbury Road: Medieval Settlement. Council Housing built in about 1927 (Locke) With what is now Victoria Road was called Kidsbury Lane on 1835 Boundary Reform Map (see Kidsbury Road) and Malt Shovel Lane on the 1868 Boundary Reform Map and 1889 OS Map, in reference to the pub (dates). Called Hillgrove Avenue on the 1904 OS Map (see Hillgrove Close). First part of terrace on the north corner with Church Path built by 1888 OS Map. Five more added to that terrace by 1904, now called ‘Newton Terrace’, and central portion of the southern terrace also built. In thirteenth and fourteenth century documents this place was spelled Keordesbury or Kerdesbury, which gives us some idea of its original meaning. The latter part, ‘bury’ is Old English for ‘fortified enclosure’. The first element appears to be an Anglo-Saxon personal name, Keorda or Kerda. So Kidsbury appears to have been Kerda’s fort (Wembdon).

Kilburn Drive: Modern Bower estate – date TBC. Named after the part of London, no obvious connection to Bridgwater, presumably the result of the developer seeking a prestigious and marketable name.

Kiko Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Kimberley Terrace: Follows the route of an old Rhyne, shown on the 1889 OS Map, dividing Castle Fields from the ‘Great Wild Marsh’, upon which this terrace was built. Appear built on the 1904 OS Map. Most likely commemorates the Siege of Kimberly during the second Boer War

Kinder Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly the German word for child.

King George Avenue: Follows the line of a very old lane, which does not appear named on any map. The housing estate appears in the 1939 Town Guide. Presumably refers to King George VI.

*King Street: Called King Street by the 1888 OS Town Plan (TBC). Probably named as a later counterpart to Queen Street (itself named as a counterpart to King Square) as it once included Court Street, opposite (and Called ‘Queen Street’ on the 1888 OS Town Plan). Called Ball’s Lane on the 1810s and 1840s Town Plans. The Balls were an influential Quaker family who built the twelve almshouses there and lived on the corner where the Wesleylan Chapel was built in 1816. Joesph Ball was a tobacconist and small-scale manufacturer. By 1836 ‘Ball’s Lane’ was apparently used by the poorer people of the town, while it was more officially known as Dampiet Street – modern Dampiet Street being called Dampiet Ward. (Metford) The two Dampiets were probably considered the same routeway, akin to Friarn Street.

Kings Road: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Presumably a reference to the Kings Sedgemoor Drain nearby, otherwise just a generic name. Several roads on this estate take aristocratic or royal designations.

King Square: Once part of the Upper Bailey of Bridgwater Castle. The larger internal gatehouse stood in the south east corner. A small cottage, part of the County Club’s west-most side, seems to have sat just inside the curtain wall and is the oldest building in the square. The square itself was laid out circa 1807, when the south side was built. The east side was begun in 1813. A small section of the north side built in 1850. The king in question the name refers to is George III.

Kings Place: Back lane to the 1807 houses of King Square, although older – appears unnamed on the 1777 Anderdon Plan. Possibly preserves the line of the curtain wall for the upper castle bailey. Appears on the 1819 Town Plan.

Kings Walk: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Subsidiary of Kings Road.

Kingfisher Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Presumably named after the type of bird.

Kingscliff Terrace: Part of the old routeway south of Bridgwater. Orchard on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. Open field by the time of the 1889 OS Map. Houses built by the 1930 OS map.

Kingsdown Close: Modern Bower estate – date TBC. Named after the part of Bristol(?), no obvious connection to Bridgwater, presumably the result of the developer seeking a prestigious and marketable name.

Kiss Arse Causeway: Part of the original Moot’s Lane, the site now under Avalon Road. Unknown significance.

Korresia Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Knightsbridge Way: Modern Bower estate – date TBC. Named after the part of London (along with others on this section of the estate), no obvious connection to Bridgwater, presumably the result of the developer seeking a prestigious and marketable name.

Knowle Road: The northern portion meeting Wyndham is shown in the 1939 Town Guide plan: shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Presumably named after Knowle on Exmore: just means hill.

L

Laburnum Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Ladymead Close: Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. Llady mead would mean the meadow belonging to St Mary, so is presumably a nod to the nearby Roman Catholic Rosary nursing home.

Lakeside Park: Modern Caravan park built over and beside a former brickyard clay pit (ie the ‘lake’).

*Lamb Lane: Between High Street and Little St Mary Street. Named after the adjoining Lamb Inn (now the Monmouth), the Inn first mentioned in 1644. As with most early Inns, the Lamb is probably a reference to ‘the Lamb of God’.

Lancaster Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of unclear significance, possibly named after the town or the World War Two Bomber.

Langport Quay/Slip: See Binford Place

Larch Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Larkspur Road: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

The Laurels: Wembdon. Date TBC, modern. Presumably named after trees planted here.

Lavender Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Lavinia Way: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett. The Lavinia was a ship seen in a postcard at West Quay dated 1914. Sunk in 1915 (Reference Index).The ship probably took its name from Lavinia, a character in Virgil’s Aeneid.

Leeward Close: Built on the site of the former Redgate factory – date TBC. Built over part of the side of the former Clark’s Redgate Factory – the road is named after Clark’s Clippers, one of their show brands (with thanks to Mike McGeown).

The Leggar: Does not appear on the 1819 Town Plan, 1824 Water Supply Plan or the 1835 Borough Boundary Map. First seen on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. Presumably contemporary with the creation of Church Street in the 1840s, providing a cut-through from Bristol Road, and cuts over various older field boundaries. Possibly originally intended as a continuation of Church Street. Leggar was a name often given to fields with bends in and can be found at various sites in Somerset (Pers Comm Peter Randle).

Leyton Drive: Bower development. Unclear significance, presumably a surname. Or could be named after the Essex town.

Liberty Place: Appears as the name of the row of terrace housing on the 1889 OS Map, when they overlooked the large marshy clay pits of the Salmon Lane Brick and Tile Works. Presumably dates to the 1840s and the St John Street development. Name taken from Liberty Cottage, shown on the 1889 OS map, now called Chubb Cottage, which the lane went out to meet, although is smaller today. Of unclear significance, although presumably just a generically positive name.

Lilliana Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called ‘Long Rap’ (TAM).

Lime Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, each named after trees types.

Limousin Way: Stockmoor Estate, built 2009. Named after a type of French cow – many of the streets on this estate are named after types of livestock (with thanks to Gary Tucker)

Linden Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Built over a field called Chick’s Seven Acres (TAM).

Linham Road: Modern, part of the Chilton Street 2001 devopment (TBC). Built over the site of the Saltlands Brickworks. Name of unknown significance.

Linley Close: Modern Bower development, date TBC. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map. Name of unknown signifcance.

Longhorn Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of cow.

Longstone Avenue: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built by 1957 at least (with thanks to Carolyn Stevens) Name of Unknown significance.

Lords Close: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles.

Losino Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Possibly refers to the place in Poland, although may be the type of horse.

Lotus Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Loxleigh Avenue: Site of a clay pit on the 1889 OS map. Not yet laid out on the 1904 OS Map. Northern portion appears on the 1930 OS map and shown in the 1939 Town Guide plan. South portion not built on the 1946 RAF survey. Name of unknown significance, possibly Robin Hood?

Loxleigh Gardens: Old trackway from the Old Westonzoyland Road/Penzoy Avenue to the buildings of ‘Foundry Farm’, now called Bridge Farm. Date of modern houseing TBC the western side is built over an old clay pit. Takes its name from Loxleigh Avenue.

Lucerne Crescent: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Ludlow Close: Open field on the 1946 RAF survey. Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Presumably named after the Shropshire Market town.

Luxborough Road: M Part of the cooperative housing state: partially built in the 1971 Town Guide plan and complete by the 1974 Town Guide plan. Names after the village on Exmoor, not far from Dunster.

Lyndale Avenue: Originally built as a private road off of Victoria, a cul-de-sack which terminated in a large wall sometime between the 1889 and 1904 OS maps. The bottom part of this road with the newer houses was built in 1927-8, as part of the Newtown Estate, by Pugsley of Bristol, although it took a few years for the two portions of the road to be joined up. (Locke)

Lyndhurst Crescent: Wembdon. Modern development, date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Built over a field called ‘Cheek’s Meadow’.

M

Magnolia Tree Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. The properties on the south side abut an old rhyne, their gardens being built over an old footpath from Moots to Chedzoy.

Majestic Road: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of little apparent significance, presumably just used to sound grand. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Mallard Way: Colley Lane housing estate, date TBC. Streets in this development were named after water birds, as this are was extensively dug for clay pits and then left as wetlands before development.

Mallow Court: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Malvern Close: Modern Bower, date TBC. Unknown significance, presumably after the town in Essex. There is some precedent for the name in Bridgwater, as Malvern House stands at the junction of Taunton Road and the Broadway. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Mandarin Close: Colley Lane housing estate, date TBC. Streets in this development were named after water birds, as this are was extensively dug for clay pits and then left as wetlands before development.

Manor Road: Part of the first phase of the Sydenham estate: shown in the 1939 Town Guide plan. Shown mostly complete on the 1956 RAF survey. Presumably names after Sydenham Manor on the other side of Bath Road, part of the old Cellophane site.

Maple Court: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora.

Maranta Court: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Marigold Road: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Marina Row: Colley Lane. Predating the docks marina by several decades, the name is of odd significance in this location, but presumably chosen as a pleasant name. Built over old clay pits, and a tramway, which followed the route of the Colley lane at the front of the properties, shown on the 1889 OS maps. The tramway is gone by the 1904 OS map, and the clay put has receded to the north and east of the site. Built by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Mariners Close: just off Polden Street, modern infill site, date TBC. Names after the 1837 Mariners’ Chapel of St John Street, which backs onto the close – properties in the close being built over the former burial ground of the chapel, in use from 1837 to 1854.

*Market Street: The street leading to the old Cattle Market, now the site of the Odeon Cinema building. First . Probably the street with the most number of names over the centuries: Cronile’s Lane in 1349 (BBA, no 155); Pynel’s Street in 1352 (BBA, nos 164, 165, 166), ‘twixt North Gate and West Gate’ in 1363 (BBA, no.206), Cronile’s Street in 1369 (BBA, no.245), then Pynel Street in 1373 (BBA, no.279). Pynel or Penel gives its name to Penel Orlieu, the meeting of Penel and Orlove Streets (or the meeting of Penel Street with the Orfaire). Called Prickett’s Lane on the 1735 Stratchey Map and 1888 OS Town Plan. Called Market Street by the 1904 OS Town Plan.

Marlborough Avenue: Built sometime between the 1930 OS map and the 1939 Town Guide. Presumably refers to John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, a renowned British general, a military counterpart to nearby Cromwell Road.

Marsa Way: Built over the car park of the Welworth Factory. The name was put forward by the Bridgwater-Marsa Twinning Association and chosen by Council. The name was unveiled on 25 March 2008 by deputy mayor of Marsa, Dominic Spenser (with thanks to Pat Morgan). The site was a brickworks between 1776 and 1956, opened by Edward Sealy and later run by the Major family (Somerset HER, no.12404). Called the Colly Lane Patent Tile and Pottery Works on the 1888 OS map.

Marsh Lane: An old lane accross the marshes, which once led to ‘Crossway’ in the 1840s (TAM)s, a brickyard by the 1880s and divided by the railway (OS).

Mayfair Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after a fancy part of London. Built over Twine Close Meadow.

Mayfield Drive: Part of the cooperative housing state. West most end begun on the 1971 Town Guide plan, complete by the 1974 Town Guide plan. Name of unknown significance.

Mayflower Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora.

Meadow Park: Wembdon. Modern, date TBC. Built over part of ‘Cheek’s Meadow’ (TAM). Unclear where ‘park’ came from.

Meadowlands Avenue: Part of the NDR development, complete by 2006. Named as such as it was built over former meadowland.

Melbourne Place: Open fields on the 1889 OS maps, although shown built by the 1904 OS map – seems to have provided better access to Sibley’s Buildings (which do appear on the 1889 OS map and form the north side of the ‘square’). Presumably named after William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, prime minister.

Mendip Road: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Named after the range of hills in North Somerset.

Merino Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly named after the type of sheep.

Merle Close: Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built over the orchard of Liberty Cottage/Chubb’s Cottage. Name of unknown significance.

Merridge Close: Part of the Cooperative House Estate. Built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans, although unnamed when it appears in the latter. Named after the village on the Quantocks, as several streets on this estate are.

Middle Stream Close: Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. The Middle Stream was a watercourse running between the Durleigh Brook in the north and Hamp Brook to the south – it provided drainage for the moor and also power for Hamp Mill. It runs along the east side of Browne’s Pond, while the Hamp Brook runs along its south. The stream is shown on the 1735 Town Plan almost meeting the South Gate, and may have been incorporated into the town’s defences. The close was named after the steam, even though its closer to the Hamp Brook. The close is built over a field called ‘Hollyland’ (TAM).

Mill Lane: See Blake Street

Mill Tail: See Blake Street

Milla Court: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Millwood Close: Later phase of the Rhode Lane estates. Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Name of unknown significance, although there was a mill in Hamp, not far from Browne’s Pond, so it is possible the wood in this area recorded on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map was also known as the Mill Wood, as well as Hamp Wood.

Milne Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

*Moat Lane: Lost to the Broadway in 1964. This lane marked the edge of the town ditch, which ran to its east. This ditch defended the Westgate. For a time Moat Lane was referred to as Bell Lane, in reference to the adjoining inn. Although this section of the town ditch has not been excavated, part of it was discovered under Mount Street in 1973, revealing it to have been about 16 feet wide.

*Monmouth Street: Part of the medieval route out of Bridgwater, from the East Gate at the top of Eastover, then to what is now Bath Road. Renamed sometime before 1852 by he inventor John Clark (Metford). Named in reference to the route taken by the Duke of Monmouth’s army before the Battle of Sedgemoor, having been camped in Castlefields. Turned into a dual carriageway in 1960 (Squibbs).

Moonraker Close: Part of the Redgate factory redevelopment, date TBC. Possibly a shoe type from the Clarke’s factory?

Moore’s Lane: Wembdon. A very ancient lane. The name is taken from the property called Moore’s, possibly an early farm, partway down the hill. Presumably owned sometime by a gentleman with the surname Moore. The lane then winds its way to Chilton Trinity, and the marshlands by the Parrett. It may once have led to a ferry crossing of the river at Dunball, where the lost town, port and castle of Downend was found on the opposite bank. Moore’s Lane may have been the route called the ‘Hareway’ in medieval documents. The meaning of this could be mundane or significant – ‘Hare’ as a placename element could refer to hares, the animal, but it could also refer to the Anglo-Saxon army. Hareway was often a name used to describe Saxon military roads, and if there was a crossing or ferry near Dunball then they would easily join on to the Roman Road running along the Polden Ridge. Running in the other direction to Moore’s is Skimmerton Lane, part of the same routeway.

Moorland Road: Part of the later phase of the Sydenham estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built over several old fields and properties, including Monmouth Villa and ‘Pople’s Five Acres’. The name is presumably referring how the estate was built over old moorland.

Moorland Way: Part of the later phase of the Sydenham estate. Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Built over a field simply called ‘Poor Ground’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Moots Lane: A modern road, not the same as the original Moot’s Lane, which ran north south, roughly along the line of Avalon Road. So called as it led to a cottage called ‘Moots’ and a like named field, shown on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map and 1888 OS map. Moots is probably possessive, the land belong to Mr Moot. The new Moots Lane is part of the later stages of the new Sydenham Estate.

Moravia Close: Modern NDR development, c.2001. Complete by 2006. Named at the suggestion of Brian Smedley in reference to the Czech Republic and Bridgwater’s twinning to Uherske Hradiste.

Moss Close: Part of the earlier phase of the Sydenham estate: first shown in the 1939 Town Guide. Probably named after the Cardiff-based builders of Frederick and Trevor Moss (with thanks to Heather Prosser)

Mount Radford: Wembdon. Radford possibly refers to a ‘red ford’ at the bottom of the Hollow Lane. The stone that makes up Wembdon Hill, apart from being soft and crumbly (often more akin to sand than stone) is found in several shades of red, hence Red-ford/Radford. However, the earliest mention of the name in 1727 calls this ‘Mount Rodburd’. The ‘burd’ element is this more likely to come from the old English beorg, which meant mound or hill. ‘Mount’ was a common local name for a mound, hence Mount Street. Certainly the summit of Mount Radford may have been much more mound like before extensive quarrying has nibbled it away. As the meaning of beorg was forgotten in everyday language ‘Mount’ was added to say the same thing – ‘mound red mound’. More poetically Mount Radford might translate as ‘the Mound on the Red Hill’.

Mount Street: A small lane running along the bank of the Town Ditch from the North Gate through to North Street. In use by the 1810s – suggested on Stratchey’s town plan of 1735. On the 1819 plan the lane is entirely bounded along its south side by the gardens of the properties in Market Street. Mostly undeveloped between North Gate and Dr Morgan’s school in the 1840s, but west of there had been built over by that time. More buildings by the 1889 OS map, terraces by 1904. Road built to connect to Penel Orlieu sometime after 1974 (TBC – possibly part of Clink plan?) The name refers to a 1640s Civil War Battery which stood at the bend near the electricity sub station. Clearly shown on the 1735 plan.

Mount Terrace: A row of cottages running between Mount Street and Market Street. Appears on the c.1854 Town Plan and 1888 OS Town Plan. Takes its name from Mount Street, in turn from the Mount. Presumably contemporary with the adjoining Mount Cottage. Still standing on the 1930 OS Map, but demolished by the time of the 1948 RAF photographic survey.

Mulberry Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora.

Muscovy Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the Principality in Russia.

Myrtle Close Bower: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Built along the boundary of two fields, the northern one called ‘Carolina’ (TAM)

N

Naples View: NDR development, part complete, part under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

Navatrin Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Nelson Court: (1980s Docks development – date TBC) Named after famous admirals of the Royal Navy, keeping with the notion of ‘Admirals Landing’. Named after Horatio Nelson.

Nepeta Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

New Road: Eastover. Does not appear on the 1853 or 1868 town plans. Appears on the 1889 OS town plan. Obviously the ‘new road’ when it was built, although why is a bit of a puzzle, as access to the north of Eastover was already supplied by East Quay. Record of a new house being built here 1885-6 (SHC, A/CMY/19)

Nicholls Close: Modern development, date TBC. Part of the medieval Northfields (TAM). Allotments on the 1946 RAF survey. Along with Furze and Phillips, this street was named after a former teacher/headmaster of the school. A Nicolls was apparently a Geography teacher there, while Miss Nicholls was headmistress before Miss Furze (with thanks to Molly Warren and Dawn Ferguson).

Nightingale Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Built over an orchard of Dunwear Farm. Presumably named after the bird type.

Noble Street: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Built over Sesland Orchard.

Nokoto Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Nolana Court: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Norfolk Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Names of unknown significance, although several in this area are named after English counties.

Northern Distributor Road: See Homberg Way

*North Street: First described as such in 1355 (BBA, no.175). Originally meaning as ‘the North Street Without the West Gate’, as opposed to West Street: at the same time the High Street was divided in two between South and North Streets. More usually known as ‘the Street to Keordesbury’ (Kidsbury) c.1300 and still called as much in 1365 (BBA, nos, 52, 165) and occasionally as ‘the Street to Wembdon’, as in 1322 (BBA, no.93).

Northfield: One of the grandest streets for the Great and the Good of Victorian Bridgwater. Does not appear on the 1853 Round Map, but is on the Hawksley 1875 map. The name refers to the field it was built over, north to distinguish it from West Field (the corner of which is where the United Reform Church now stands). This was important agricultural land for the town in the middle ages. The original North Fields also incorporated the Cricket ground and Nicholls Close.

*Northgate: Not long after the town formed in 1200, defences were laid out in the form of the town ditch and four sturdy gates. These were as much for show as defence, as the town soon expanded beyond them. The first mention of the North Gate seems to come in 1352, when what is now called Angel Crescent was first mentioned: ‘twixt Northgate and Orlove Street’ (Orlove now Clare Street, BBA, no.165). The road outside the gate, vering sharply east before turning north, came to be known in reference to the gate. Mount Street is a nineteenth century addition, while the Clink extension dates to the 1980s. Of the Northgate itself, Jarman (1889) notes: The North Gate stood at a point outside King’s-square ; and inserted in the wall of a house immediately opposite the entrance gate to Blacklands and corresponding corner of the Girls’ National School is (or was) a square stone, inscribed “ Here stood the North Gate.” It was the earliest, to be removed.

North Gate Cottages: a row of cottages on the northern side of the bend of Northgate. These appear on the 1824 Water Supply Town Plan. They appear to have been demolished by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

North Gate Yard. Invented in 2021. Of no historical significance but coined as a marketing gimmick, as ‘yards’ are fashionable.

Nursery Terrace: Built between the 1889 and 1904 OS maps, and before the adjacent terrace in Kidsbury Road.

O

Oak Apple Drive: Modern, largely complete by 2006. The name takes its lead from Old Oak Close. Built over a field called ‘the acre’, which was wooded in 1840, but clear by 1889 (TAM and OS), and another called ‘Barn Seven Acres’.

The Oaks: Wembdon. Modern, date TBC. Built over the site of Oakfield House, both names referring to the surrounding oak trees.

Oakfield Road: South portion seems to follow an old trackway leading to a cattle pit, although the name is unrecorded. South portion shown in the 1939 Town Guide. Housing shown on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Extended north as part of the cooperative housing estate by the 1967 Town Guide plan. Seems fairly treeless on the 1889 OS map, but there may have been an oak tree along one of the field boundaries here.

Oakgrove Way: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Octavia Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called ‘Long Rap’ (TAM).

Old Basin: Immediately in front of the terrace was once the terminal basin of the Bridgwater and Taunton Canal, although the site is now a green. Shown on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map, although in-filled by the time of the 1889 OS map. A section of the canal up to there had survived by that time, but it seems to be silted up by the 1904 OS map.

Old Library: 2021 development, the name being a mistaken reference to the County Library Services Headquarters: there was never a library on this site. Previously part of Dr Morgan’s School, before it moved to the Haygrove site.

Old Market Road: Construction started 2018. The road leading to, and continued into, the site of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. The name is slightly unfortunate as ‘Old Market’ always referred to Penel Orlieu, to differentiate it from this market.

Old Oak Close: Part of the c.2001 NDR development, complete by 2006. Named for the huge oak tree this street circles round, a well-known landmark before the houses were built. The field in which the tree stands was called ‘Crab Acre’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map, while that to its sound (the close straddles both) was called ‘Margery’s Wood’. The oak seems to be shown on the 1889 OS plan, although with a second very close by. A water pit, now under number 20, is marked ‘spring’ in 1889.

Old Taunton Road: See Taunton Road, old and new

Olive Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Given a couple of nearby streets, this is possibly just a reference to the colour.

Orchard Lane: Wembdon. The site of an orchard, the grounds of Hill Grove House. A stone coffin was discovered here in the nineteenth century: possibly a site of executions.

Orchid Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Orion Drive: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Unclear significance – Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett?

Orkney Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the group of islands off the north coast of Scotland.

Orlove Street: See Clare Street

Osborne Road: Part of the Newtown Development. Not yet built on the 1930 OS map, although a junction had been built in preparation. Shown as a cul-de-sac on the 1946 RAF photographic survey, terminating just north of Berrydale Avenue. Extended north by the 1961 Town Guide plan, then loops west by the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unknown significance. Built over a field called Dunmead (TAM).

Oxen Drive: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name refers to this.

Oxford Terrace. Part of the Old Colley Lane, before it was divided into a cul-de-sac by the creation of the Railway Bridge in about 1873. Presumably the terrace dates to around that time. Certainly shown complete on the 1889 OS Town Plan. Name of unknown significance

P

Palm Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Palmer Close: Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC. Most of the streets on this development were named after Bridgwater worthies.

Park Avenue: Shown in the 1939 Town Guide and east of Quantock Avenue largely complete on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Built over a field called ‘Parks’ (TAM). Presumably the site of a hunting park in the middle ages: not a park in the modern sense.

Park Road: Begun by 1904 OS map, extended by 1930 leading to the Girls’ Grammar School Shown in the 1939 Town Guide leading to the County School for Girls. Built over fields called ‘Parks’ (TAM). Presumably the site of a hunting park in the middle ages: not a park in the modern sense.

Parkstone Avenue: Name of unknown significance. Possibly a significant rock in part of the park of Hamp House. Field just called ‘Roadside’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, still a field on the 1888 OS map. The four south east houses had been built by the 1904 OS map, and no change is shown on the 1930 OS map. The rest of the road was presumably built soon after. Road appears in the 1939 Town Guide: shown complete, aside from the south west portion, on the 1948 RAF photographic survey. The extension also resulted in the demolition of a house on Taunton Road, to improve access.

Parkway: Not shown in the 1939 Town Guide plan, although other parts of the Sydenham estate are shown. Early northern stage shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Complete as far as the secondary school by 1953, the southern portion shown under construction at that time. (BFA: EAW051177) Secondary School opened 1963 (Squibbs). Completed by 1971 (Town Guide). Name of unclear significance.

Parrett Way: Colley Lane Industrial Estate. This was one of the first new roads, laid out c.1965, extended over the years and complete by 1974 (Town Guide, 1965, p.61; Town Guides, 1968, 1974). The exact meaning of the name Parrett is a mystery.

Pathfinder Terrace: Built over an orchard. Terrace shown built by the 1930 OS map. Name of unknown significance, possibly a ship?

Peace Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). Presumably named after Alfred Peace 1845-1912, Merchant and Mayor, and one of the prime movers behind bringing the Somerset and Dorset Railway to Bridgwater.

Peach Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Pear Tree Close: Shown on the 1974 Town Guide plan. One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Built over an orchard.

Pearl Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Hither Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Yonder Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Pelham Court: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). Name of unknown significance. Marsh on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Pembroke Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans) Names of unknown significance, although several in this area are named after British counties.

Penarth Road: Shown in the 1939 Town Guide and largely complete on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Presumably named after the Welsh town.

Penel Street: See Market Street.

*Penel Orlieu: Once part of what was considered the ‘Great Street’ or ‘Great Royal Street’ which ran from the West Gate (now the junction of Penel Orlieu and Broad Street) to the town Bridge, via the Cornhill, and described as such in the 1260s to 1290s (BBA, nos 16, 21, 24 and 37). Even called High Street in 1295 (BBA, no.38). More commonly, this area was often named in relation to the West Gate, ie ‘within the West Gate’ in 1291 (BBA, no.33.). A cattle market was held here by the end of the fourteenth century at least, and the area was known as ‘Le Orfaire’ by 1399 (BBA, no.492). This market was held here until 1935. The medieval market had a market cross, which became known as ‘Pig Cross’ by 1610, presumably as pigs were sold here alongside cattle (Lawrence, p.33). The area is called Pig Cross on the 1735 Stratchey Map. The name Penel Orlieu was originally used to refer to the broad (and vague) meeting points of medieval Pynel’s Street (now Market Street) and Horlocke’s/Ordlof’s Street (now Clare), which included parts of what is now High Street

Penlea Avenue: Named after the adjoining Penlea House of c.1850. How old the name is is unclear: on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map the land is just called ’15 acres’, which adjoined ‘Higher 6 Acres’ and ‘Hamp Wood’. It could be an old name for this area, or else just a name made up for the house, possibly meant to evoke somewhere like ‘Penlee’ in Cornwall. If the name is local then it might mean something like Pen/Enclosure in the Leigh/Clearing in Old English, if its taken from Penlee in Cornwall it means something like ‘head of light’ in Old Welsh. The road itself is much older than the 1940s housing (the estate in the process of being laid out in the 1946 RAF photographic survey), shown on the 1888 OS maps leading from Rhode Lane to provide access to a field (called ‘Little Pocock’s Tail’ in the 1840s – TAM) and the stables of Penlea House.

Penlea Close: Part of the stable and service yard of old Penlea House (see above).

Pennycress Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Penzoy Avenue: This is a very old part of the Old Westonzoyland Road, which included Salmon Lane, then a section of Colley Lane that was cut in two by the railway line. Called ‘Old Westonzoyland Lane’ on the 1889 OS Map, leading to Foundry Farm. Called ‘Old Westonzoyland Road’ on the 1904 OS map, Foundry Farm now being called Bridge Farm. Finally Penzoy Avenue on the 1930 OS map, by which time the northern row of houses had been built. The southern side had been built by the 1946 RAF survey. At this time the road was a cul-de-sac. Penzoy refers to a place on the Levels, part of the ‘zoy’ series of names, ‘pen’ probably coming from an Old English word for enclosure. See Weston Zoyland Road for the ‘zoy’ element.

Peridot Close: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Perry Green: Wembdon. A very ancient trackway, with evidence for prehistoric settlement here. This lane probably represents the limit of livable land before the marshland between here and the River Parrett. The name means place of pear trees (or literally, it’s quite pear-y here) (Ekwall)

Petrel Close: (modern development – date TBC?) One of a group of names remembering Bridgwater ships, including Irene, Rosevean and Severn. The Petrel was a steam paddle tug, built in 1863 and served until 1866 (Reference Index p.34). A Petrel is a type of seabird. Built over fields called Pill’s or Poll’s Door on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Phillips Close: Modern, date to be confirmed. Built over the site of the Girl’s Grammar School, which was built between 1904 and 1930. In turn built over a field called ‘Parks’ (see Park Avenue). Along with Furze and Nicholls, this street was named after a former teacher/headmaster of the school. A Philips was a Latin teacher at the school for some time (with thanks to Molly Warren and Dawn Ferguson).

Phoebe Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Pig Cross: See Penel Orlieu.

Pine Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

The Pippins: Wembdon. Built over ‘Cross Acre Orchard’, which appears on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. Name presumably refers to the type of desert apple.

Plum Lane: Somerset Bridge. An old lane, appears on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map leading from Dunwear Lane to the Dunwear Brick and Tile Works and named on the 1889 OS map. The southern loop is suggested on both maps, going between the brickyard buildings. Presumably named after adjoining orchards, a number of cottages on the north side are shown on the 1840s map.

Plum Tree Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Polden Street: South portion appears to have begun by the 1851 Round Map, although little sign of development on the 1875 Hawksley Map. Appears on the 1889 OS map. Takes its name from the nearby Polden Hills.

Pollard Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). Pollarding is a practive whereby Willow Trees are stripped back to the trunk so the branches can be used in weaving and construction. However, this road is probably named in honour of Henry W. Pollard, mayor of Bridgwater in 1893, 1894, 1895, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1910 and 1911. Partially built over the site of Bower Farm.

Popham Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) Named after a local worthy, although exactly who TBC. The Pophams were a notable local landholding family, and one of them was General-at-Sea alongside Blake. Built over a field called ‘Barnes’s’.

Poplar Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Poppy Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Portland Place: Wembdon: Unclear significance, possibly a reference to Portland Cement, which was pioneered in Bridgwater. ‘Hills Meadow’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. Show built on the 1889 OS Town Plan.

Positano Court: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

Potterton Close: Wills Road Estate, date TBC. This street is named after the first female mayor, Mrs AB Potterton.

Prices Lane: Takes its name from Price’s Buildings, a row of cottages adjoining the Lime Kilt Inn, presumably named after their builder, although called Lime Kiln Terrace on the 1889 OS town plan. The lane is shown on the same plan, running alongside a long shed of the Salmon Lane Brick and Tile Works. Although the site of brick kilns at this time, lime working is noted ont he site on the 1840 Tithe Apportionment Map.

Primrose Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Priory Court: A 1996 development, built over the grounds of ‘The Priory’. Bridgwater never had a medieval priory, this name was concocted in the late nineteenth century to re-brand the large house here. Until 1892 the house was called ‘the Mansion House in St Mary Street’, although this had caused some confusion with the nearby Mansion House Inn on the High Street. The core of the house was built circe 1703, when Dr John Allen bought three properties and pulled them down for this building, which originally fronted Little St Mary Street. The house was extended by his son Benjamin, then transformed in turn by his son, Jeffreys Allen, who turned the house back-to-front and built a high wall along St Mary Street. This building was purchased by the Rural District Council in 1936 and used until the formation of Sedgemoor District Council in 1974. It was then left vacant before being converted into flats (Lawrence).

Provident Place: Designed in May 1845 by Edwin Down (Gibson A\CMY/3), at the time the street was unnamed. Built as good-quality workers cottages by prominent members of the Unitarian Congregation. Built over land called ‘Tom’s Close’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map. When first built this street was surrounded by open fields.

Purley Drive: Modern Bower estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Pynel Street: See Market Street.

Pyrland Walk: Cooperative housing estate, built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. Named after the Somerset village, as several streets on this part of the estate are.

Q

Quantock Avenue: Early development off of the 1924 Quantock Road, from which this takes its name. Not yet started on the 1930 OS Map. Shown in the 1939 Town Guide. Mostly complete, aside from a few houses on the south west , on the 1946 RAF survey.

Quantock Road: Named as the route towards the Quantocks. Intended as a bypass for the steep hill of Wembdon. Built as part of a public works scheme to ease unemployment in 1923-4 (Locke). Cemetery laid out 1928 (Squibbs). The name Quantock is of obscure origin, but is presumed to come from the Old Welsh for something like circle or rim (Ekwall).

Quantock Meadow: Modern, date TBC. Takes its name from Quantock Road. Built over a field called ‘Coles Eleven Acres’ (TAM). A large Cow Pit was once on the site of number 4.

Quantock Terrace: The east part of this street was originally part of the Leggar (see that entry), which was divided off with the construction of the Somerset and Dorset Railway line in 1890. Terrace housing had been built here by the 1904 OS Map. The west part was built sometime after the removal of the railwayline – it does not follow the route of the diverted Leggar. Presumably named for providing a view from the Bristol Road of the Quantock Hills in the distance.

Quantock Way: Modern, date TBC. Takes its name from Quantock Road. Built over a field called ‘Coles Eleven Acres’ (TAM).

Quayside: Part of the 1980s (TBC) Docks development, a reference to the quayside of the docks.

Queen Street: Does not appear on Stratchey’s Plan of 1735, but he made known omissions of existing features. Possibly preserves the line of the curtain wall of Bridgwater Castle. With Court Street, called Coffee House Lane on the 1777 Anderdon Map and the 1810s Town Plan. By the 1888 OS Town Plan, Court Street and the eastern portion of modern Queen Street were Queen Street, while the western portion was still Coffee House Lane. By 1904, Queen Street and Court Street had settled to how we know them now. Does not appear on the 1735 Stratchey Map, but this may have existed at this point as a trackway – an entrance that now forms Court Street is shown. Possibly an older trackway within the old castle Lower Bailey. If named as a counterpart to King Square in 1807, then this would be Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

Queens Road: Part of the Rhode Lane housing estate. Not on the 1930 OS map, but appears in the 1939 Town Guide. Shown complete on the 1946 RAF survey. Named after Queen Elizabeth, consort of George VI.

Queenswood Lane: The 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map appears to show that the old Queen’s Wood was on the southern slope of the hill, bounded between what is now Queenswood Lane and the Durleigh Road, although may once have been much larger in extent. The lane is shown on the map and is named on the 1889 OS map. The west of the lane is ‘Skimmerton’, possibly a deserted village.

Queenswood Road: South portion shown under construction and nearing completion on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Extended north as part of the cooperative housing estate between the 1961 and 1967 Town Guide plan.

R

Raglan Close: (modern development, date TBC) One of a series of roads in a new estate to be named after historic palaces, although this is a castle in Wales.

Raleigh Close: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Presumably named after Sir Walter Raleigh.

Rambler Way: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. Of of a group of names celebrating local carnival clubs. Ramblers Carnival Club was founded in 1961.

Ravello Mews: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

Reedmoor Gardens: NDR development, complete by 2006. Named after the moorland (marshes) this road is built over. The name means either the red moor or the moor with lots of reeds. Noted as both ‘Red Moor’ and ‘Reed Moor’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, Reed-moor on the 1889 OS map.

Redgate Street: Named after Redgate House. The house was occupied in the 1860’s by Mr Bennett, a local cattle dealer (Squibbs No 168). In turn named after a red gate/because it had a red gate. Previously called Wellington Place, presumably after the victor of Waterloo. Wellington Place is mentioned by 1873 (Somerset Heritage Centre DD/SC/G1393/53)

Reed Close: Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC. Most of the streets on this development were named after Bridgwater worthies. Presumably named after notable Town Clerk Paul Octavious Haythorne Reed. Reed had lived at nearby Hamp House.

Regal Walk: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Regent Way: art of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Given nearby Buckinham Close, this may be a link to George IV, Prince Regent, although that has no association with Bridgwater.

Regents Court: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Rhondda Place: A small court off of Market Street, at the end of Theatre Place. Appears on the 1888 OS Town Plan, name of unclear significance, but presumably relating to the place in Wales. Presumably demolished in the 1960s to create a car park, then in turn redeveloped for Angel Place.

Rhode Lane: A very ancient lane leading to the settlement of Rhode. Spelled ‘Road’ on the 1888 OS maps. The name probably refers to the Old English ‘Rod’ meaning ‘clearing’, suggesting this area was once wooded (Ekwall). Council Housing Scheme c.1929, Samson & Colthurst architects (Gibson A\CMY/157). Called ‘West Road’ on the 1835 Borough Boundary Map.

Rhyne Bridge: Literally the location where a bridge crosses a rhyne, rhyne being a local word for a man-made drainage channel (never ‘water-filled-ditch’). The Rhyne is question is the Srockmoor Rhyne, which was crossed at this point by the main route to North Petherton. Housing appears to have been built here by the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Richmond Close: Modern development, date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Adjoined a field to the east of former clay puts of the Saltland Brick and Tile Works.

Ringwood Road: Called Ringwood Close on the 1974 Town Guide plan, when it was newly built. Site of an orchard on the 1940s Tithe Apportionment Map, part of the property of Hamp House. Name of unknown significance, presumably chosen as it sounds pleasant.

Risedale Close: Wembdon. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974). Other names in this development had Cumbrian or north western origins, such as Brantwood and Grasmere (both Cumbria), Silverdale (Lancashire). Unclear relationship to Wembdon.

Risemoor Road: Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Risemoor is the name of the floodplain between Bridgwater and Hamp, bounded by the Durleigh and Hamp Brooks. The name probably means the moor (or marsh) covered in brushwood (probably brambles bushes) (Ekwall).

Riverside: Extension of the 1930s Riverview development. Appears on the 1939 Town Guide Plan.

Riverview Terrace: Incorporates River View and Riverview Terrace. The south portion, started by the time of the 1930s OS Map, occupies the site of Nation’s ship building yard, while north, complete by the time of the 1946 RAF survey, was the site of a birckyard in the 1840s (TAM), although open fields by 1889.

Roberta Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Robins Drive: Castlefields Industrial Estate. Modern. Name of unknown significance. Site of a football ground on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Part of Great Castle Field in the 1840s (TAM).

Roe Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, not yet built in 1968, but presumably very soon after (Town Guide, 1968). Partially built over part of Dunwear Farm. Name of unknown significance, presumably after the type of deer.

Roman Lane: A very ancient trackway, which connected Haygrove to Durleigh, although it seems to have diminished to a footpath over the nineteenth century. The tarmacked portion is shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unknown significance, presumably thought to be a roman feature, which is certainly possible, although not a ‘Roman’ road in the classical sense.

Romney Road: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Roper’s Lane: See Albert Street

Rosa Way: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field called ‘Long Rap’ (TAM).

Rosary Drive: Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. Takes its name from the Roman Catholic Rosary Convent/Nursing Home, over which grounds this road was built. The rosary is an important part of Roman Catholic prayer.

Rosebery Avenue: Built between the 1889 and 1904 OS maps. The lower part of Bailey Street was once called ‘Upper Rosebery Avenue’. Presumably named after the liberal Prime Minister Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery. It is not clear by such a figure would be so honoured, as his ministry was largely a failure, although liberal members of the Town Council may have pushed for this.

Rosevean Close: (modern development – date TBC?) One of a group of names remembering Bridgwater ships, including Irene, Severn and Petrel. The Rosevean, a schooner, was built in 1846 and survived until 1906 when it was hulked on the banks of the Parrett. It was mentioned in James Joyce’s Ulysees (Reference Index p.35). Rosevean is a rock off the Scillys, and a Cornish Hamlet, so the ship was presumably named after one of these. Built over fields called Pill’s or Poll’s Door on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Royal Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand.

Ruborough Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, east portion laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). West portion added by 1968. Presumably named after the Hillfort on the Quantocks.

Ruby Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Russell Place: The Docks. This row of cottages appear on the 1835 Borough Boundary Map, and so predate the Docks of c.1840. Unclear who this was named after.

Ryland Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

S

Sable Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Salerno Court: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

*Salmon Parade: Called Salmon Lane by the 1810s, previously ‘the road to Somerton’ in 1735. Referred to as ‘the road to Western Zoyland’ in 1770 (Somerset Heritage Centre D/B/bw/CL/81). Named after the Salmon Inn, next door to the Infirmary, which later expanded over the Inn site in about 1862 (Squibbs no.47) The Inn was in turn named after the Salmon [nets] which were set up along the Parrett. Still called Salmon Lane on the 1819 Town Plan. Called Salmon Parade by the 1889 OS map. Seems to have been called Salmon Parade by 1854 (Somerset Heritage Centre DD/X/DAE/1-2)

*Salmon Lane: This name was once applied to what is now Salmon Parade, then the dog leg before reaching the Old Westonzoyland Road. By 1889 Salmon Lane included the part at right-angles to the river, then the turn south, then the turn east (now Colley Lane) and this continued to the 1930 OS map. Straightened c.1965 (1965 Town Guide, p.61)

Saltlands: First mentioned in October 1371 ‘Saltelond’ (BBA, no.266). Presumably refers to how this land regularly flooded with salt water from the Parrett. A brickyard was here by the 1840s (TAM), and ‘Saltlands House’ appears on the 1889 OS map. The modern road is built over the house’s garden. Modern development, presumably 1950s or 1960s.

Saltlands Avenue: An old track, appears on the 1840s Tithe Apportioment Map. Divided the Crowpill brickyard from and Saltlands House. Houses built on the south side by 1904, when it is called ‘Avenue Road’. Likewise 1930s OS map. Called Saltlands Avenue in the 1961 Town Guide.

Samphire Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Sandford Hill: Takes its name from the sandy ford over the Perrymoor Brook, which also gives its name to the nearby Farm and deserted medieval village. Sandford is the name for the west part of Wembdon Hill: it being named in three sections, Sandford in the west, Mount Radford in the middle and Wembdon in the east. The ford had been bridged by the time of the 1889 OS map.

Sand Mews: Modern NDR development, post dates 2006. Name of unclear significance. Built over a field call Musgraves (TAM).

Sandalwood Ride : Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the type of tree.

Sandown Close: Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Partially built over the site of Hamp House. Name of unknown significance.

Sandpiper Close: See below.

Sandpiper Road: Colley Lane housing estate, date TBC. Streets in this development were named after water birds, as this are was extensively dug for clay pits and then left as wetlands before development.

Sandringham Close: (modern development, date TBC) One of a series of roads in a new estate to be named after historic palaces. Built over a field called ‘Southovers’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Sapphire Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Sauneye Way: Post 2009 Jam Factory redevelopment. Name of unclear significance. Some streets on this estate took nautical names associated with the River Parrett?

Savannah Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the area of Africa.

Saviano Way: NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

Saxon Green: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. The Saxons are one of the peoples who make up the English, who arrived in Britain in the centuries following the Roman withdrawal. Bridgwater was part of the Kingdom of the West Saxons from around 658-692 until it transformed into the Kingdom of England under King Athelstane.

Saxon Road: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Partially built over an orchard. See Saxon Green.

Saxony Place: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named after the region in Germany.

Sedge Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Sedgemoor Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Named after the local district, which means the moor or marsh belonging to a man called Sicga (Eckwall).

Selworthy Close: Modern Wills Road Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Senna Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Severn Close: (modern development – date TBC?) One of a group of names remembering Bridgwater ships, including Irene, Rosevean and Petrel. The Severn was a Trow, built in 1830 and survived until 1936 when it was hulked at Combwich (Reference Index p.36) Built over fields called Pill’s or Poll’s Door on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Seymour Road: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Built over a field called ‘Poor Ground’ in the 1840s (TAM). Presumably named after the Seymour Dukes of Somerset.

Shearwater Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, not yet built in 1968, but presumably very soon after (Town Guide, 1968). Built over a field called ‘Pit Close’ in the 1840s (TAM). Presumably named after the bird type, one of the Petrel family.

Shellthorn Grove: Wills (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) Presumably refers to Shelthorne near Broomfield, although spelled with two ls. Possibly named after a local worthy like other streets on this estate.

Shepherds Close: Wembdon. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974). Presumably a name with no more meaning that it sounds pleasant (unless named after someone called Shepherd. Built over an orchard.

Sheridan Close: Modern Dunwear Lane development. Name of unclear significance. Built over an orchard.

Shervage Court: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Name of unclear significance.

Shetland Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance, Shetland is a group of Islands in the far north of Scotland, although this may refer to the type of pony. Built over a field called Priest Meadow (TAM).

Shire Street: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. A shire is the older name for ‘county’. Possibly a reference to the type of horse here.

Showground Way: Modern, date TBC. Mostly built by 2006.

Sibley’s Buildings: Tucked between Bristol Road and Bath Road, although also called Bryant’s Buildings. Shown on the 1889 OS map, before the construction of Melborne Place. Sibley and Bryant will have either built or owned these houses.

Sika Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Silver Street: Called ‘twixt the parish church and the Friars Minor’ in 1330 (BBA, no 114). Apparently the name Silver Street does not seem to occur before 1730 (Lawrence). Assumed to refer to the Silversmith’s trade.

Silverdale Close: Wembdon. Built by 1974 (Town Guide, 1974). Other names in this development had Cumbrian or north western origins, such as Risedale, Brantwood and Grasmere. Unclear relationship to Wembdon.

Simmmental Street: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Possibly named after the breed of cow.

Skimmerton Lane: Wembdon. Skimmerton sounds like a placename, possibly the Skinner’s farmstead, although nowhere of that name now exists. Some fields near the end of the lane near Durleigh have the name Skimmerton, which were between Queenswood Lane and Skimmerton Lane (TAM), and this may indicate a deserted medieval village. Alternatively, a ‘Skimmington’ was a route where cuckolded husbands would be ritually processed out of a village and dumped in a pond (Wembdon).

Smalens Close: Stockmoor Estate, built 2009. Named after a type of French cow – many of the streets on this estate are named after types of livestock (with thanks to Gary Tucker).

Snowberry Close: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Several streets on this estate are named after berry types. Built over a field called ‘Long Rap’ (TAM).

Somerset Gardens: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Named after the county – several streets on this estate take their name from British shires.

Somerset Place: A small court between Mount Terrace and Hutchings Buildings. Appears on the c.1854 Town Plan and 1888 OS Town Plan. Still standing on the 1930 OS Map, but demolished by the time of the 1948 RAF photographic survey. The exact significance of the name is unclear, aside from referring to the county.

Somerset Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Named after the county – several streets on this estate take their name from British shires.

Somerton Close: Later phase of the Sydenham estate, date TBC, probably 1970s. Named after the Somerset town, the farmstead used in the Summer (Ekwall).

Somerville Way: Dunwear lane development, date TBC. Built over a large orchard. Name of unclear significance.

Sorrel Drive: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Sorrento Mews: NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

*South Bridge: Also called Lyme Bridge (BBA, no.297). Probably a bridge over the Durleigh Brook outside of the South Gate in St Mary Street. First mentioned. Frog Lane (now covered over by Blake Gardens) was described as leading to Lyme Bridge.

Southlea Gardens: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after the house South Lea, itself built sometime between 1904 and 1930.

*Southgate: The name given to the stretch of St Mary Street between the junctions with Friarn and Dampiet and south to the actual South Gate and a little beyond. Named as such on the 1735 Stratchey Map, the 1819 Town Plan, the 1840s Town Plan, but out of use by the time of the 1889 OS maps. Of the South Gate itself, Jarman (1889) says: “South Gate stood in the lower part of St. Mary-street, near Holy Trinity Vicarage, on the town side of the little brook ; a butcher’s shop now occupies the exact spot of one of the sides. Loads of hay coming from Taunton-road could scarcely pass underneath, and the gateway was ultimately abolished. The immediate cause of its demolition was that one Sunday morning a quantity of gunpowder was found in some of the fissures of the structure, and it was feared that some miscreants intended blowing it up, to prevent which it was taken down. There were three archways to each of the four gates, similar to old Temple Bar, a large one in the centre for vehicles and a small one on either side for pedestrians. They are stated to have been of very massive construction, as befitted the stirring, troublous times when they were needed.” The South Gate was first mentioned around 1341, although is certainly older (BBA, no.129; Somerset Heritage Centre D/B/bw/696). This document also mentions a ‘place’ without the South Gate called ‘Rekkehei’ which is a mystery.

Southgate Avenue: named after Southgate House, the name given to the Taunton Road Turnpike Toll House. That was in turn named after the town’s medieval South Gate (see above), although being some fair distance from that older structure. Originally this was just the dog-leg in Old Taunton Road, probably built 1829-30 to join it to the new: the old Taunton Road probably continued past what is now the back of the toll house before that time. The first part of the terrace, of eight houses in the south west portion, was built sometime before the 1904 OS Maps. The road’s eastward extension, and the north and south eastern terraces were complete by the 1930 OS map.

Sovereign Road: (Modern Development, date TBC) Part of a grouping of Bridgwater ship names (Irene, Severn, Petrel and Rosevean), so possibly a reference to the Sovereign of the Seas, a huge warship associated with General at Sea Robert Blake. Built over fields called Pill’s or Poll’s Door on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

*Spaxton Road: The continuation of Durleigh Road west, the road to Spaxton. A very old trackway. Spaxton probably means ‘the councillor’s farmstead’, ie a property given by the king to one of his councillors (Ekwall).

Spencer Close: Dunwear Lane development. Partly built over Follett’s Farm. Name of unclear significance.

Spillers Close: Wills Road Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the Spiller Sisters, noted philanthropic ladies who lived in Sunnybank, Hamp. The pond at the end of this street is an old cow pit, from when this land was pasture.

Spoonbill Road: Colley Lane housing estate, date TBC. Streets in this development were named after water birds, as this are was extensively dug for clay pits and then left as wetlands before development.

Springfield Avenue: Modern, first shown on the 1961 Town Guide Plan. Name of unclear significance, possibly just a pleasant name.

Springley Road: Modern Bower development, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Squibbers Way: Completed in 2019, connecting Stockmoor to the Colley Lane Industrial estate. The name was put up for public vote, 2,728 people voted and Squibbers Way won with 59% of the vote, and celebrates the town’s tradition of Squibbing at each carnival. ‘Squib’ is an old work for firework, and outside of Bridgwater is only really known through the phrase ‘damp squib’. Second in the vote was Brickyard Way with 19%, which would have commemorated the old brickyard on this site, the ruins of which were removed during development. The contractors on the new road were Whitemountain. Construction included two new bridges: Crossways Bridge over the canal and Somerset Bridge over the Parrett, which at 52 metres long is the longest single span bridge in Somerset.

Squibbs Close: Modern Bower development, date TBC. Named in honour of one of the Squibbs dynasty, of town councillors, possibly Philip J. Squibbs, who was a noted Bridgwater historian. Built over a field called ‘Pig Acre’, part of the Bower Farm complex.

St Davids Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC). St David is the patron saint of Wales.

St James Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC). Perhaps unknown to the developers, there was a chapel dedicated to St James within the medieval church of St Mary’s in Bridgwater.

St John Street: Probably laid out in 1836, after the passing of the Bristol and Exeter Railway Act that permitted the building of a railway that would run past Bridgwater. The new street would run over old farmland from Eastover to the new station. The road had been laid out at least by 1837, the year the Mariners’ Chapel was built. By 1839 there was the street’s first in, ‘The Three Queens’ (although exactly where is not clear). The railway station opened in 1841. (Squibbs) The name refers to St John’s Hospital, which stood near the East Gate. Some ruins survived until the creation of the road, which was built over them.

St Marks Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC). Probably unknown to the developers, a freestanding chapel to St Mark stood within Bridgwater Castle, somewhere near the present site of Castle Street.

*St Mary Street: The way to St Mary’s Church. First mentioned in 1298 (BBA, no.45). A ‘Y’ shaped street, stretching from the South Gate round to the Cornhill, with a portion running towards Penel Orlieu (Little St Mary Street). The portion south of Friarn/Dampiet junction often called South Gate, as in 1341 (BBA, no.129, also see the 1735 Stratchey Map).

*St Matthews Field: (or ‘Fairfield’) takes its name from the medieval fair held there, which was held on St Matthew’s day on 21 September. This particular fair was first mentioned in 1249 and was the second annual fair allowed to the town. It was principally for the sale of sheep and originally held inside the town, probably on the Cornhill. Outgrowing its original home, the fair moved to the Fairfield by 1404 and has been held there ever since.

St Matthews Green: Modern West Street redevelopment, probably 1960s (date TBC). Takes its name from St Matthew’s Field.

St Pauls Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC).

St Peters Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC).

St Saviours Avenue: Named after St Saviour’s House, Taunton Road. The House adjoined the Durleigh Brook, and the site is now occupied by the Blake Hall and Biddiscombes: part of the back wall of the old house survivies and can be seen on Blake Street. The Avenue was built on the tree lined walk in the House grounds and was designed by Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles (1844 – 1920). He had a hand in setting up the open-air pool on the other side of the Avenue (See Squibbs pp.100-1). The house was named after the chapel of St Saviour, which stood where the Old Taunton Road meets the River Parrett. The house was built upon the land attached to the chapel, albeit at the other end. (chapel details – and page for website)

St Thomas Court: One of a series of closes named after saints off Somerville Way, part of the late 20th century Dunwear Lane development (date TBC).

Stafford Road: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). One of a number of names taken after counties of Britain. Mostly built over Great Dunwear Field.

Standish Street: Under construction in 2006. Part of the NDR/Western Way development. Name of unclear significance. Built over part of the Saltlands Brick and Tile Works – mostly clay pits.

Stanley Close: Wills Road Estate – date TBC. Most streets in this estate were name after Bridgwater worthies. This name was put forward by Mick Briscombe, named after E.J. Stanley, MP for Bridgwater 1885-1905 (with thanks to Brian Smedley).

Stanley Terrace: Bristol Road, east side. Built sometime after the 1886 OS map. It is unclear who this is named after – possibly E.J. Stanley, MP for Bridgwater 1885-1905 – possibly Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904) who famously went looking for David Livingstone in 1871.

Steam Packet Terrace: Modern – date TBC, built over the site of the old Steam Packet Inn, St John Street. The name refers to the ‘Packet Trade‘. The Inn’s first recorded landlord is mentioned in 1866, it closed in 1958.

Steers Close: Construction started 2018. Part of the New Market redevelopment. Built over the site of the 1935 livestock market. Name refers to this.

Stockmoor Close: Stock Moor is the name for the low lying ground between Hamp and North Petherton. This close is modern infill on land along the Taunton Road (date TBC). The name means the moor (or marsh), although the Stock element is harder to define. It originally just meant ‘place’ but could refer to a monastry (so is this the moor belonging to the monastery, ie Athelney?) or cattle farm, so the moor of the cattle farm(Ekwall).

Stockmoor Drive: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named after the marshland it was built over.

Stratton Close: Dunwear Lane Estate, date TBC. Name of unknown significance. Built over a field called ‘Stoles’ (TAM).

Suffolk Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). The names of this part of the estate tend to derive from British counties. Built over a field called ‘Little Longland’ (TAM).

Sully Close: Modern Bower estate, date TBC. Built over fields adjoining Bower Farm. The name presumably refers to George Bryant Sully, a noted coal merchant and ship broker, who served as mayor of Bridgwater.

Sultan Court: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance, presumably just a grand name.

Sunnybank Road: Named after and built over Sunny Bank House, a grand villa built in the 1850s by Mr Browne and home for many years to the Spiller Sisters. The house had been demolished and the new housing estate shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. The name is a simple name, probably chosen by Mr Browne when he built the house. In the 1840s this was an open field with no particular name, which adjoined Hamp Wood to the north (TAM).

Sunnymead: Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. The name means ‘the sunny meadow’ and is riffing on Sunnybank, the name of a grand Victorian house which was nearby. Built over the site of Hamp Wood on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Sussex Avenue: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). One of a number of names taken after counties of Britain. Built over Home Field and Kennell Field (TAM).

Sussex Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). One of a number of names taken after counties of Britain. Built partially over the orchard of Bridge Farm.

Sycamore Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora.

Sydenham Close: Still fields on the 1946 RAF photographic survey. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Built over a field called ‘Poor Ground’ in the 1840s (TAM). Named as a continuation of Sydenham Road on the opposite side of Parkway.

Sydenham Road: Not on 1939 Town Guide plan. Shown under construction on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Takes its name from the nearby manor of Sydenham, centred on the old manor house, the name meaning ‘the wide ham’, ham being the root of the words for Hamp, Hamlet and Home, meaning settlement.

T

Tansey Court: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

*[Old] Taunton Road: Called ‘Road from Taunton’ on 1735 Stratchey’s Map. The original course probably went past what is now the back of the old tollhouse, the dog leg being added in 1829-30 so all traffic would have to pass the one side of the gate. Called ‘Without the South Gate’ in 1341 (BBA, no.129).

[New] Taunton Road: The section from the Durleigh Brook to Southgate Avenue was built 1829-1930, as a modification of the turnpike route (VCH).

Teak Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Orchard on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map.

Teal Close: Colley Lane housing estate, date TBC. Streets in this development were named after water birds, as this are was extensively dug for clay pits and then left as wetlands before development.

Teasel Path: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Teeswater Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Possibly refers to the type of sheep.

Temblett Green: Wembdon. Modern development, date TBC. Name of unknown significance, although Temblett is a local name, so presumably in honour of a local worthy. Built over a field called Long Meadow.

Tetton Close: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. One of a series of names on a new estate taken from local villages. Built over part of the Queenswood (TAM)

Theatre Place: with Rhondda Place, stretched between Clare/Back Street and Market Street/Prickett’s Lane and ran parallel to Angel Crescent. Theatre place took its name from the town’s theatre, which had previously occupied the site, and was apparently a copy of the Adelphi theatre of London. In 1837 it had been fitted out with gas lighting and heating. Exactly when it was built is unclear: an earlier theatre had apparently occupied the opposite side of the street. The theatre proved to be unprofitable, the Town Council removed its licence in 1853 and was so pulled down and replaced with a row of cottages (Jarman, chapter 18). Each cottage of Theatre place appears to have an out house on the 1888 OS Town Plan, which suggests a better class of court then the Bridgwater standard – Jarman described them as ‘neat’. These were demolished in 1960 to make way for a car park, which in turn is now occupied by the Angel Place Shopping Centre.

Thompson Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). Presumably named after the Thompson dynasty of Quaker ironmongers of Bridgwater. Possibly Francis James Thompson, mayor.

Thorncombe Crescent: Part of the Sydenham Estate, under construction in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Presumably named after the village in Dorset. Several streets in this vicinity take their names from ‘-combe’ placenames. Built over a field called ‘Copland’ (TAM)

Timberscombe Way: Part of the cooperative housing state: built between the 1971 and 1974 Town Guide plans. Streets on this part of the estate were taken from local villages. Built between two old fields, one Broadlands and the other Skimmerton.

Tokaro Close: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Tone Drive: Colley Lane Industrial Estate. This was one of the first new roads, laid out c.1965, completed by 1968 (Town Guide, 1965, p.61; Town Guide 1968). One of a number of roads in this estate to be named after Somerset Rivers. Tone derives from an Old Welsh term for ‘Roaring Stream’ (Ekwall).

Topaz Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. A number of roads on this estate are named after pretty stone types. Built over a field called ‘Yonder Thirty Acres, as opposed to ‘Hither Thirty Acres’, presumably in relation to Cockpit Farm. (TAM).

Tori Green: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance.

Toulouse Road: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the place in France.

Tracey Close: Horsey. Modern. Date TBC. Significance unclear: possibly after the builder’s surname?

Trevor Road: Sydenham estate. Shown in the 1939 Town Guide. Complete by 1953 (BFA: EAW051177). Possibly named after the Cardiff-based builders who built the properties here, Frederick and Trevor Moss (with thanks to Heather Prosser).

Trinity Way: Modern NDR development and a continuation of Feversham Avenue, complete by 2006. Refers to the village of Chilton Trinity, Trinity being because the church there is dedicated to the Holy Trinity.

Triscombe Avenue: Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate: appears on the 1961 Town Guide Plan. Streets on this part of the estate were taken from local villages. Partly follows an old trackway leading to the ‘Parks’.

Tudor Way: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) Most streets on this new estate celebrated notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC) However this could be a generic name referencing the royal dynasty.

Tuli Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the breed of cow rather than the Filipino rite of circumcision.

Tulip Tree Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Tundra Walk: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Named after frozen wasteland.

Turin Path: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy. Built over a field called ‘Rag’ (TAM).

Turner Close: New development off Old Taunton Road (date TBC). Named after Councillor John Turner, and during his lifetime, which is a high honour as this is not usual practice.

Tynte Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) Probably named after Charles Kemys Tynte or his son of the same name of Halswell House, who served as MPs for Bridgwater. Built over fields called ‘Barnes’ and ‘Pig Acre’, and some buildings associated with Bower Farm.

U

Union Street: Presumably both a literal name as it joined the Bristol and Bath Roads, but also a celebration of the political Union of England, Scotland and Ireland. Built by 1835 Boundary Map of Bridgwater, and houses presumably followed soon after. cf Bristol Road and the Leggar. Two houses and a workshop were built here in 1838, over land called ‘Small Croft’ (Somerset Heritage Centre DD/X/DEV/9).

V

Valetta Place: Named after the capital of Malta. Exactly why so named is unclear. Possibly because of the town’s trading connections, possibly in commemoration of the British capture of Malta in September 1800. The date of this pretty set of buildings is unclear, as this area is a blindspot for the various early maps we have for the area. The first definitive appearance is on the 1841-1854 Map of the western side of the town. There were originally five more properties, although these were demolished for the GWR railway line to the docks. A deed for 1799 descrives

Verbena Walk: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Verona Court: NDR development, under construction in 2006. One of a series of names taken from places in Italy.

Vicars Lane: Wembdon. This lane is the former driveway to Hillgrove House, which served as vicarage for Wembdon for many years. Also see Orchard Lane. Hillgrove is on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, and presumably dates to sometime in the half century before this.

Vickery Close: Modern development, date TBC. Built over the site of Pound Farm and the medieval hamlet of Haygrove. Name of unknown significance.

*Victoria Road: Called Kidsbury Lane on 1835 Boundary Reform Map (see Kidsbury Road) and Malt Shovel Lane on the 1868 Boundary Reform Map, in reference to the Inn (dates). The row of houses there are called Washington Terrace on the 1888 OS Maps, although this seems only have applied to the housing rather than the entire road. Named in honour of Queen Victoria, it seems sometime after the 1888 OS map, possibly at the time of her diamond jubilee in 1896, if not for her golden jubilee in 1887. A counterpart to Alexandra Road. In older documents this is referred to as the Drove in 1813 and 1819, a way for driving and hearding livestock (SHC DD/OS/7).

Vienna Way: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Presumably named after the city in Austria, once the imperial capital of the Hapsburg Empire.

Violet Path: Post 2006 Willstock Estate, date TBC. Named after a type of plant.

Viscount Square: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. One of a series of names taken from aristocratic titles.

W

Wadham Close: Modern Bower Estate, date TBC. Possibly after either Wadham College, Oxford, where Robert Blake was educated, or the Somerset landed family who sponsored it.

Walnut Drive: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1967 and 1968 (Town Guide Street Plans). A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Built over a field called Pit Close, possibly due to the presence of a cow pit (TAM).

Walton Close: Modern Bower Estate, date TBC. Name of unknown significance.

Wares Lane: Wembdon. The same Ware as Ware’s Warehouse at the docks, who lived in the large Oakfield House opposite the lane in the nineteenth century. A very old trackway between Kidsbury and Wembdon, houses had been built along the northern side by the time of the 1946 RAF photographic survey.

Warren Close: Modern riverside development, date TBC. Built over the site of Crowpill brick yard.

Warwick Avenue: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Several of the streets in this estate take their names from British counties. Partially built along the boundary of ‘Cockage’s Orchard’ on its north east side. The rest occupied ‘Kenneil Field’.

Washington Gardens: Built sometime between the 1889 and 1904 OS maps. Brassiere factory of Leffman Ltd opened 1939, previously the workshops of T. Stockham, builders (Squibbs). Presumably took its name from Washington Terrace. Built over a field called Cooper’s Four Acres (TAM)

Washington Terrace: The name of the long Victorian terrace in Victoria Road, built sometime between the 1840s and the 1889 OS map, encompassing all the buildings on the west side of the road up to Washington Gardens. This part of Victoria Road/Malt Shovel Lane was sometimes referred to as Washington Terrace before more houses were built. Named after their builder/developer. The Blake Museum has a collection of insurance documents for No 17: BWRAB : 2014/1/28

Waterford Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Watermans Meadow: Modern NDR development, complete by 2006. Name of unclear significance, possibly another name for the field it was built over, although it is recorded as ‘Four Acres’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Waverley Road: Later addition to the Newton Estate to provide access to the flats built over the site of the old mump in the late 1980s-2000s (dates TBC). Presumably named to evoke waves, Waverley comes from the huge popularity of Walter Scott’s novel, one of the few novel titles to become a widespread placename.

Wayhure: See Horsepond Lane

Weacombe Road: Part of the Sydenham Estate, under construction in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Presumably named after the place in West Somerset.

Wellington Road: Part of the St John Street development – not on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, or the 1851 Round Map. Appears on the 1889 OS Map. Presumably named in honour of the Duke of Wellington.

Wellington Place: See Redgate Street

Wembdon Common: Former ‘common land’, ie for the use of the villagers to keep livestock, which runs alongside Church Lane and the Crowpill Rhyne. Now laid out as parkland. The Kidsbury Levels, were also known as ‘the Common’.

Wembdon Hill: The exact meaning of the name ‘Wembdon’ is contested. The latter element is straightforward, ‘don’ usually means ‘hill’ The first element is harder to pin down. That it has an apparently superfluous ‘b’ indicates that there has been a contraction and a squeezing out of an old syllable. In the Domesday Book of 1086 the parish is called ‘Wadmendune’. The Oxford Dictionary of English Placenames suggests this comes from ‘weapmann’ meaning huntsman – so Wembdon thus means ‘Hill of the Huntsman’. Another explanation is put forward by Stephen Robertson in his Somerset Place Names. Wad-men-dune could be the hill (don) of the Wad-men, the men who wade. Wembdon Hill was largely surrounded by marshy land with only small trackways connecting it to Crowpill in the east, Cannington in the west or Bridgwater to the south east, then this name makes perfect sense. Anyone living here necessarily had to do a fair bit of wading through wetland, even if only during the winter. The Hill itself is split into three: Wembdon Hill in the east, Mount Radford at the eastern summit, then Sandford on its western slope.

Wembdon Rise: A modern name applied to the old part of the Wembdon Road within the village of Wembdon itself. Name does not appear on the 1889, 1904 or 1930 OS maps. Date TBC.

*Wembdon Road: A very old route between Bridgwater and Wembdon, which also provides the parish boundary between the two parishes. Unclear when this became the principle route between the two, as there was also a favoured route via Kidsbury, now preserved in footpaths accross the commons. Presumably this route was the easier for carts and early wheeled vehicles. Given the amount of red-Wembdon sandstone used in Bridgwater castle that would have needed carting, this may have popularised this route c.1200.

Wessex Close: Still open fields in 1953 (BFA: EAW051177) Shown on the 1967 Town Guide Plan. Partially built over Monmouth Villa and its gardens, along with adjoining orchards. The name refers to the kingdom of the West Saxons, which, from the east conquered as far as the River Parrett in 658, expanding further west in 682.

West Bower Lane: The road leading to West Bower Farm off of Spaxton Road, once the site of an important Tudor manor house. Bower means ‘Cottage’ in Old English (Ekwall). Just ‘Bower Lane’ on the 1889, 1904 and 1930 OS maps, but presumably changed to avoid confusion with [East] Bower Lane.

*West Quay: Usually referred to as the ‘Quay’ in the medieval records of the town. Originally just riverbank, has been built vertically fromt he edge of the riverbed over the centuries. Unclear if it was always a direct route to north of the castle, or how the quay was accessed over the castle moat – a bridge over a weir presumably gave access. Marked ‘Key’ in 1735. Portion beyond the castle moat (now roughly marked by Chandos Street) was called ‘the Butts’ (1735 Stratchey Map), probably referring to a place for archery practice. Became ‘West’ quay sometime after the 1840s when the east side of the river was developed into East Quay.

*West Street: A very old road, possibly predating Bridgwater – the name simply means the west-most street of the town. First mentioned on 6 July 1335, relating to a property ‘outside the West Gate of the town in the street called Weststret’ (BBA no.121). Presumably when the town was originally laid out in 1200 the development stopped at the West Gate – by this time however there were clearly a series of tenements. The West Gate itself was first mentioned sometime between the 1260s and 1290s (BBA no.25) and stood in the middle of where the Broadway Junction is now.

Western Way: Modern, built between 2001 and finished by 2006, including a new bridge. Part of the Northern Distributor Road development.

Westfield Close: West Street. c.1965 – TBC. The name Westfield for the 1960s buildings here comes from Westfield House, which stood on the corner of Matthew’s Field and West Street, but in turn took its name from the field it was built on, along with a portion of the rest of old West Street. West Field was akin to North Field, one of the town’s original medieval agricultural fields.

Westminster Way: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after the seat of government in London. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

*[Old] Weston Zoyland Road. The Old Westonzoyland Road took the route which is outlined by Salmon Parade, Salmon Lane, then what are now called Colley Lane, Penzoy Avenue, then it seems to have curved up to the course of the current Westonzoyland Road, then tracked behind what is now Dunwear House, past Dunwear Farm, then following the current route. Old Westtonzoyland Road was specifically given to Penzoy Avenue on the 1889 and 1904 OS maps. The name means to road leading to Westonzoyland.

[new] Weston Zoyland Road: laid out circa 1840, connecting the new St John Street to the Old Westonzoyland Road. The railway bridge was built here in c.1873 (MS). The road has been straightened in the mid-twentieth century as there used to be a bend by Dunwear Farm, now the site of St John and St Francis Primary School.

Westover Green: West Street – date TBC. The school is built over Wembdon Road Nursery. The two roads and houses are built over old West Street houses: the main road being built over Cook’s Place court. The name is modern and presumably is a fun riff on medieval Eastover.

Westwood Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). Presumably just a woodland reference, as are several streets in this estate are named after tree types. As this was reclaimed marshland there was no wood here in recorded history.

Whitebeam Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC). A reference to a tree type, as are several streets in this estate are. Bower Built over a field called Deacons (TAM).

Whitehall Drive: Modern Little Sydenham Estate, post 2006 – date TBC. Little apparent significance: just a pleasing name to sound grand. Named after the seat of government in London. Built over a field called Lower Blind Yeo (TAM), suggesting that this was the site of a silted up tributary or course of the Parrett – Yeo being a common river name, blind meaning it came to a dead end.

Whites Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Whitfield Road: Late 20th c. Bower development. South most portion shown, unnamed, on the 1974 Town Guide plan. Name of unknown significance – local worthy?

Wigeon Road: Post 2006 Stockmoor Estate, date TBC. Name of unclear significance. Presumably named after the type of duck.

Wilkins Road: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) Name of unknown significance – local worthy?

Willoughby Road: Part of the cooperative housing estate, built by the time of the 1967 Town Guide plan. Name of unknown significance. Built over fields known as ‘Copse’ (TAM)

Willow Brook: Albert Street

Willow Court: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Appropriate in this instance, given how willows were used to line the rhynes in the marshes here.

Willow Walk: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1961 and 1967 (Town Guide Street Plans). Presumably just a reference to the tree type. Appropriate in this instance, given how willows were used to line the rhynes in the marshes here.

Wills Road: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. Presumably named after Frank Wills -TBC

Wind Down Close: Part of the cooperative housing estate built by the 1967 Town Guide plan. Names after the place ont he Quantocks, akin to other streets on this estate to be named after local villages. Built over the old Queenswood (TAM)

Windsor Road: (modern development, date TBC) One of a series of roads in a new estate to be named after historic palaces. Built over a field called ‘Southovers’ on the Tithe Apportionment Map.

Winford Terrace: Lower Bath Road. Modern, date TBC. Name of unknown significance.

Witches Walk: Named after the feature running through the Risemoor Marsh, made by the dual channels of the Middlestream Rhyne. Sadly nothing to do with witches or walks: this is a corruption of ‘Weech’s Wall’. The Weech family (often pronounced and even spelt witch) owned land here and built a boundary (Lawrence). The modern street was named in honour of this feature, although at a distance from it. Shown newly built on the 1974 Town Guide plan.

Withygrove Close: (late 20th c. Bower development – date TBC) One of a series of streets in a development, mostly named after trees types and flora. Marshland on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment map.

Wolmer Close: (Part of the Wills Road Estate, date TBC) One of a series of names on a new estate celebrating notable townsfolk. (Exactly Who TBC)

Woodbury Road: Part of the Cooperative Housing Estate: appears on the 1961 Town Guide Plan., with its northern portion still under construction. Named in honour of Maurice Woodbury, a Labour councillor and Managing Secretary of the Bridgwater Co-operative Society and later the West Somerset Co-operative Society, which was behind the estate upon which this road was built (Stafford & Pers Comm. Brian Smedley).

Wordsworth Avenue: Counterpart to the ‘Coleridge’ street names, as Coleridge and William Wordsworth worked together in Somerset on the Lyrical Ballads, and some of their best-known poems in the late 1790s, although Coleridge had more of an association with Bridgwater. Part of the 1930s Newton Estate, although not shown on the 1930 OS map. Complete by the time of the 1938 Whitby Directory. Built over a field called ‘Walfords’ (TAM).

Wrenmoor Close: Westonzoyland Road Estate, laid out and built between 1967 and 1968 (Town Guide Street Plans). Unknow significance. Built over fields called ‘Montacues’.

Wye Avenue: Westonzoyland Road Estate, not yet built in 1968, but presumably very soon after (Town Guide, 1968). Unknown significance. Presumably just a reference to the river.

Wylds Road: (later 20th century – time of Chandos Bridge?) Built over the site of Wyld’s or Wild’s Cement Works (built after 1888, called Spinx Cement Works on the 1904 OS Map), and the older Castle Field Brick Works slightly to its south. The area was called ‘Great Wild Marsh’ on the 1840s Tithe Apportionment Map, south of which is Castlefields.

Wyndham Road: Part of the Sydenham Estate. Shown in the 1939 Town Guide: appears complete on the 1946 RAF aerial photographic survey. The counterpart to Fairfax Road, remembering the commanders of the opposing armies during the Storm of Bridgwater in 1645. Probably a reference to Edmund Wyndham, Royalist governor of the town, who lost the battle.

Y

Yeo Road: Final part of the late 1960s Colley Lane Industrial: built between 1971 and 1974 (Town Guides, 1971, 1974). Estate One of a number of roads in this estate to be named after Somerset Rivers. ‘Yeo’ means ‘forked river’ from the Brythonic language (Ekwall).

York Buildings: Name appears on the 1888 OS maps. Does not appear on earlier maps. Unclear significance. Possibly a reference to the Duke of York, who was brother to the Duke of Clarence, to whom the opposite Clarence Hotel is named after.

York Road: Part of the 1930s Hamp housing scheme. Road appears in the 1939 Town Guide. Several of these names were taken from royal titles, in this case the Duke of York, specifically the future George VI.

Z

Zeta Close: Horsey. Modern. Date TBC. Significance unclear: presumably refers to the last letter of the Greek alphabet.


Notable Name Omissions

William Baker, noted local natural historian.

John Bowen

William Brewer/Briwere, founder of Bridgwater

Arthur Alfred Burrington – artist, friend of Monet.

John Chubb – artist, mayor and campaigner against the slave trade.

Thomas Bruce Dilks – notable Bridgwater historian, who worked tirelessly to promote the town’s history

Sydney Gardnor Jarman – notable Bridgwater historian

Arthur Powell – notable Bridgwater historian

Jonathan Toogood notable Bridgwater physician

Notable Bridgwater-Associated Women for Street Names

Sara Blake – mother of the famous admiral.

Maud de Braose, Baroness Mortimer – notable medieval woman, important in the second Barons’ War and owner of the Lordship of Bridgwater

Josaphine Clofullia – internationally famous bearded lady, who died in Bridgwater and was buried in a pauper’s grave.

Emelotte – widow of Robert Dod, possibly the first recorded woman living in Bridgwater c.1260s, who owned a market stall.

Edith Mary Dukes, nee Pope – educationalist, public speaker, philanthropist and mother of Paul, Ashley and Cuthbert Dukes.

Saint Katherine – had an altar in St Mary’s Church before the Reformation.

Juliane/Juliana Mauger – the first recorded woman, positively dated (6 February 1268) living in Bridgwater, who gave land to the Chantry of the Blessed Virgin Mary in St Mary’s Church.

Isolda Parewastel, medieval holy woman.

Fanny Talbot – donated the first property to the National Trust.

Beatrice de Vaux – wife of William Brewer, who founded Bridgwater.

Christabella Wyndham, the wife of Col Wyndham, Royalist Governor of Bridgwater Castle in the Civil War. She was wet-nurse to Charles II. Legend suggests she took a pot shot at Oliver Cromwell during negotiations in the siege, killing a cornet by his side. (check Oldmixon for the story)

Reference Abbreviations

BBA: Thomas Bruce Dilks, Bridgwater Borough Archives, 4 vols – document numbers listed below.

Blake 2: Bridgwater: the Second Selection: compiled from the collections at Blake Museum (2001)

BM: Bridgwater Mercury

Ekwall: Eilert Ekwall, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Placenames, fourth edition (Oxford, 1960)

Locke: Will Locke, Times Remembered of Bridgwater in the 1920s and 1930s. (1983)

Metford: Isabella Metford’s unpublished annotations in Jarman’s History of Bridgwater (1889), in posession of the Bridgwater Heritage Group.

MS: Pers Comm, Mike Searle, hon. curator, the Blake Museum.

Pidoux: I.G. Pidoux, St john the Baptist Bridgwater 1840-1962: Pictures from the Past (2000)

Squibbs: Phillip J. Squibbs, Squibbs’ History of Bridgwater (1982)

Stafford: Eric Stafford, Brick upon Brick 1944-1994: the first fifty years of the South West Co-Operative Housing Society Ltd (1994)

TAM: Tithe Apportionment map.

VCH: A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 6, Andersfield, Cannington, and North Petherton Hundreds (Bridgwater and Neighbouring Parishes). Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1992

David Williams, Bridgwater Inns Past & Present (1997)

Wembdon: MKP, Wembdon: Church, Village and Parish (2017)

MKP Spring/Summer 2021